See also: càraid

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

caraid

  1. (archaic, dialectal) inflection of cara:
    1. dative singular
    2. nominative plural

NounEdit

caraid m (genitive singular carad, nominative plural cairde)

  1. (Cois Fharraige) Alternative form of cara (friend)

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
caraid charaid gcaraid
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *kareti (to love), from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂- (to desire, wish).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

caraid (conjunct ·cara, verbal noun serc or carthain)

  1. to love
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 23d10
      nob·carad glosses uos desiderabat
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 56b31
      Cía techtid nach aile ní ad·chobrai-siu ⁊ ní techtai-siu ón immurgu, ní étaigther-su immanísin, .i. ní ascnae ⁊ ní charae; is sí indala ch⟨í⟩all les isindí as emulari in sin.
      Though another may possess what you may desire and you may however not possess, you should not be jealous of that thing, i.e. you should not seek after and love it; that is one of the two meanings that he finds in emulari.
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 56b39
      Ad·n‑amraigther .i. no·n‑étaigther .i. ad·cosnae són nó no·carae
      that you sg may admire, i.e. that you may emulate i.e. that you may strive after or love

InflectionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: car

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
caraid charaid caraid
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish cara (friend, relation) (compare Irish cara, Manx carrey), from Old Irish carae (friend, relation), from Proto-Celtic *karants (friend), from Proto-Indo-European *kéh₂ros (dear) (compare Latin cārus, English charity, whore).

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /kʰaɾɪtʲ/

NounEdit

caraid m (genitive singular caraid, plural càirdean)

  1. (male) friend
    Bu tu fhéin an caraid is cha b’ e sin a h-uile caraid.You’re an extraordinary friend.
    Cha chall na gheibh caraid.It is no loss what a friend gains.
    Is e an caraid caraid na crùthaig.A friend (to one) in need is a friend indeed.
  2. relative, cousin

Usage notesEdit

  • In the sense "friend" also caraidean is used as plural form.
  • The vocative form is used when addressing people in correspondence:
    “A Charaid, ...”“Dear Sir, ...”
    “A Chàirdean, ...”“Dear Sirs, ...”
    “A Sheumais, a charaid, ...”“Dear James, ...”

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
caraid charaid
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • caraid” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.