See also: càraid

Contents

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

caraid

  1. (archaic, dialectal) dative singular and nominative plural of cara

NounEdit

caraid m ‎(genitive singular carad, nominative plural cairde)

  1. (Cois Fharraige) Alternative form of cara(friend)

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
caraid charaid gcaraid
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

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VerbEdit

caraid

  1. to love

InflectionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • caraid” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish cara(friend, relation) (compare Irish cara, Manx carrey), from Old Irish carae(friend, relation), from Proto-Celtic *karants(friend), from Proto-Indo-European *kéh₂ros(dear) (compare Latin cārus, English charity, whore).

NounEdit

caraid m ‎(genitive singular caraid, plural càirdean)

  1. (male) friend
    Bu tu fhéin an caraid is cha b’ e sin a h-uile caraid.
    You’re an extraordinary friend.
    Cha chall na gheibh caraid.
    It is no loss what a friend gains.
    Is e an caraid caraid na crùthaig.
    A friend (to one) in need is a friend indeed.
  2. relative, cousin

Usage notesEdit

  • In the sense "friend" also caraidean is used as plural form.
  • The vocative form is used when addressing people in correspondence:
    “A Charaid, ...”
    “Dear Sir, ...”
    “A Chàirdean, ...”
    “Dear Sirs, ...”
    “A Sheumais, a charaid, ...”
    “Dear James, ...”

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
caraid charaid
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit