English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ʃæʃ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æʃ

Etymology 1 edit

See sash.

Noun edit

shash (plural shashes)

  1. (obsolete) The scarf of a turban.[1]
    • [1650, Thomas Fuller, “The Land of Moriah”, in A Pisgah Sight of Palestine and the Confines thereof; with the History of the Old and New Testament Acted thereon. [], London: William Tegg, published 1869, →OCLC, book II, paragraph 24, page 279:
      So much for the silk in Judea, called shesh in Hebrew, whence haply that fine linen or silk is called sashes, worn at this day about the heads of eastern people.
      Spelled shashes in the 1st edition (1650).]
  2. (obsolete) A sash.[2]
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Imitative?

Noun edit

shash (uncountable)

  1. (television) Synonym of snow (random pattern of dots when there is no signal)
    • 1997, Paul Kriwaczek, Documentary for the Small Screen:
      Even productions designed for office or home video viewing usually need a title sequence to mark off the empty tape, hiss and shash from the prepared recording []
    • 2012, Paul Farley, Michael Symmons Roberts, Edgelands: Journeys Into England's True Wilderness, page 159:
      No one sees shash now, but it was naked television. Shash was the term for those black-and-burst patterns that danced across the screen when there was nothing being broadcast.
References edit
  • Brian Armstrong (1976) The Glossary of TV Terms, page 80

Verb edit

shash (third-person singular simple present shashes, present participle shashing, simple past and past participle shashed)

  1. (intransitive, rare) To produce white noise.
    • 2003, Libby Purves, Casting Off:
      The machine shashed and crackled, broadcasting silence. Urgently the man repeated, 'Shearwater, Shearwater, Shearwater. This is Brewmarine. Keith speaking. Over. Over.' More shashing, more silence.

Anagrams edit

Afar edit

Noun edit

shash? ? 

  1. A black strip of cloth worn on the head by married Afar women as part of the traditional dress.[1]

References edit

  1. ^ Jim Haskins and Joann Biondi (1995) From Afar to Zulu : a dictionary of African cultures, New York: Walker, page 8

Navajo edit

 
Navajo Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nv

Etymology edit

Proto-Athabaskan *xʸɨshʷ (bear). Compare Ahtna sos.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

shash

  1. bear (animal)

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Young, Robert; Morgan, William; Midgette, Sally (1992) Analytical lexicon of Navajo, Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, →ISBN, page 468

Western Apache edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

shash

  1. bear