sight unseen


Alternative formsEdit


Reportedly first attested 1892


  • enPR: sīt′-ŭn-sēn


sight unseen ‎(not comparable)

  1. (idiomatic) Not having seen the object beforehand.
    • 1902, Myrtle Reed, Lavender and Old Lace, ch. 5:
      When she wrote, asking me to take charge of her house while she went to Europe, I gladly consented, sight unseen.
    • 2005 Aug. 2, Michiko Kakutani, "They'll Take Manhattan, for a Million or More," New York Times (retrieved 1 Sep. 2008):
      More than $300 million worth of condominiums were sold in the new Time Warner complex sight unseen while the building was still under construction.

See alsoEdit

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