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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

simple +‎ -istic

AdjectiveEdit

simplistic (comparative more simplistic, superlative most simplistic)

  1. Overly simple.
  2. In a manner that simplifies a concept or issue so that its nuance and complexity are lost or important details are overlooked.
    • (Can we date this quote by Allen Suess Whiting and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      (Mao's) reliance on simplistic Soviet interpretations was reflected in his dismissal of Hitler as "a mere will-less puppet of the reactionary capitalists."[1]
    • (Can we date this quote by Jacques Lambert and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The cliché is not untrue, but, like all generalisations, it distorts reality so that overly simplistic judgments have to be tempered by a few qualifications.[2]
  3. (obsolete) Of or relating to simples, or medicinal herbs.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wilkinson to this entry?)

Usage notesEdit

  • Simplistic is not to be conflated with simple; simplistic implies simplicity that distorts the topic, whereas simple does not. Degrees of comparison such as "more simplistic" and expressions such as "overly simplistic" accordingly are in some sense tautological and some speakers avoid them.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ China Crosses the Yalu: The Decision to Enter the Korean War[1], Stanford University Press, 1968, →ISBN, pages 211–
  2. ^ Jacques Lambert (1967) Latin America: Social Structure and Political Institutions[2], University of California Press, →ISBN, pages 107–