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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English simple, from Old French and French simple, from Latin simplex (simple, literally onefold) (as opposed to duplex (double, literally twofold), from sim- (the same) + plicare (to fold). See same and fold. Compare single, singular, simultaneous, etc.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

simple (comparative simpler or more simple, superlative simplest or most simple)

  1. Uncomplicated; taken by itself, with nothing added.
    • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, chapterI:
      “[…] We are engaged in a great work, a treatise on our river fortifications, perhaps? But since when did army officers afford the luxury of amanuenses in this simple republic? []
    • 2001, Sydney I. Landau, Dictionaries: The Art and Craft of Lexicography, Cambridge University Press ISBN 0-521-78512-X, page 167,
      There is no simple way to define precisely a complex arrangement of parts, however homely the object may appear to be.
  2. Without ornamentation; plain.
  3. Free from duplicity; guileless, innocent, straightforward.
    • John Marston (ca.1576-1634)
      Full many fine men go upon my score, as simple as I stand here, and I trust them.
    • Lord Byron (1788-1824)
      Must thou trust Tradition's simple tongue?
    • Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)
      To be simple is to be great.
  4. Undistinguished in social condition; of no special rank.
  5. (now rare) Trivial; insignificant.
    • 1485, Thomas Malory, Le Morte d'Arthur, Book X:
      ‘That was a symple cause,’ seyde Sir Trystram, ‘for to sle a good knyght for seyynge well by his maystir.’
  6. (now colloquial) Feeble-minded; foolish.
  7. (heading, technical) Structurally uncomplicated.
    1. (chemistry) Consisting of one single substance; uncompounded.
    2. (mathematics) Of a group: having no normal subgroup.
    3. (botany) Not compound, but possibly lobed.
    4. (zoology) Consisting of a single individual or zooid; not compound.
      a simple ascidian
    5. (mineralogy) Homogenous.
  8. (obsolete) Mere; not other than; being only.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      A medicine [] whose simple touch / Is powerful to araise King Pepin.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

simple (plural simples)

  1. (medicine) A preparation made from one plant, as opposed to something made from more than one plant.
  2. (obsolete) A term for a physician, derived from the medicinal term above.
  3. (logic) A simple or atomic proposition.
  4. (obsolete) Something not mixed or compounded.
    • Shakespeare
      compounded of many simples
  5. (weaving) A drawloom.
  6. (weaving) Part of the apparatus for raising the heddles of a drawloom.
  7. (Roman Catholicism) A feast which is not a double or a semidouble.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

simple (third-person singular simple present simples, present participle simpling, simple past and past participle simpled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive, archaic) To gather simples, i.e., medicinal herbs.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin simplex.

AdjectiveEdit

simple (epicene, plural simples)

  1. simple (uncomplicated)

SynonymsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin simplex.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

simple (masculine and feminine plural simples)

  1. simple (uncomplicated)
  2. single (not divided into parts)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


ChavacanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish simple (simple).

AdjectiveEdit

simple

  1. simple

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From simpla +‎ -e.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsimple/
  • Hyphenation: sim‧ple

AdverbEdit

simple

  1. simply

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, borrowed from Latin simplex.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

simple (plural simples)

  1. simple
    Un homme simple
    A simple man
  2. one-way
    Un billet simple
    A one-way ticket
  3. mere
    Un simple soldat
    A mere soldier

Usage notesEdit

The first and second meanings are taken when the adjective is placed after the noun. The third meaning is taken when it is located before the noun.

NounEdit

simple m (plural simples)

  1. one-way ticket
  2. (baseball) single

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin simplex. Displaced Old Portuguese simplez.

AdjectiveEdit

simple m, f (plural simples)

  1. simple

GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

simple

  1. inflected form of simpel

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

simple

  1. vocative masculine singular of simplus

Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

simple

  1. definite singular of simpel
  2. plural of simpel

Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

simple

  1. definite singular of simpel
  2. plural of simpel

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin simplex.

AdjectiveEdit

simple m (oblique and nominative feminine singular simple)

  1. innocent
  2. mere; simple
  3. honest; without pretense
  4. peasant, pauper (attibutive)

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

simple

  1. inflection of simplu:
    1. feminine plural nominative
    2. feminine plural accusative
    3. neuter plural nominative
    4. neuter plural accusative

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin simplex.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsimple/, [ˈsĩmple]

AdjectiveEdit

simple (plural simples)

  1. simple (uncomplicated)
    Synonyms: sencillo
    Antonyms: complicado, complejo
  2. (before the noun) mere, ordinary
    Synonyms: mero
    Soy un simple pescador.I'm just a fisherman.
  3. simple, single (not divided into parts)
    Antonyms: compuesto
  4. simple-minded, stupid
  5. insipid, flavorless
    Synonyms: soso
  6. (grammar) simple

NounEdit

simple m, f (plural simples)

  1. simpleton, fool
  2. (pharmacology, masculine only) simple

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

simple

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of simpel.