See also: Slade and släde

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English slade (low-lying ground, a valley; a flat grassy area, glade; hollows of clouds; a creek, stream; a channel), from Old English slæd (valley, glade), from Proto-West Germanic *slad, from Proto-Germanic *sladą (glen, valley), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Proto-Germanic *sladaną (to glide, slip) or Proto-Germanic *sladdaz (to be slack, droop). Compare Old Norse slóð (track, trail).

NounEdit

slade (plural slades)

  1. (now rare or dialectal) A valley, a flat grassy area, a glade.
    • a. 1472, Thomas Malory, “(please specify the chapter)”, in [Le Morte Darthur], book V, [London: [] by William Caxton], published 31 July 1485, OCLC 71490786; republished as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, Le Morte Darthur [], London: David Nutt, [], 1889, OCLC 890162034:
      Yet he slow in the slade of men of armys mo than syxty with his hondys.
    • 1612, Michael Drayton, Poly-Olbion song 13 p. 222[1]:
      The thick and well-growne fogge doth matt my smoother slades,
      And on the lower Leas, as on the higher Hades
      The daintie Clover growes (of grasse the onely silke)
      That makes each Udder strout abundantly with milke.
  2. (dialectal) A hillside.

Etymology 2Edit

Unknown.

NounEdit

slade (plural slades)

  1. A spade for digging peat.
  2. (obsolete) The sole of a plough.
    • 1945 January 29, “Pattern Prays”, in Time Magazine:
      The Bishop, wearing a gleaming cape of green and gold, raised his hand over the plough and the kneeling farmers: "God speed the plough: the beam and the mouldboard, the slade and the sidecap, the share and the coulters [] in fair weather and foul, in success and disappointment, in rain and wind, or in frost and sunshine. God speed the plough."

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

slade

  1. vocative singular of slad

Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

slade (Cyrillic spelling сладе)

  1. vocative singular of slad