squamate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin squāmātus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

squamate (comparative more squamate, superlative most squamate)

  1. (chiefly zoology) Covered in scales.
    • 1982, TC Boyle, Water Music, Penguin 2006, p. 45:
      The ground here, it seems, is a mecca for the costive denizens of the Sahel, an unspoiled latrine for Mother Nature and all her feathered, furred and squamate creation.

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

squamate (plural squamates)

  1. Any reptile of the order Squamata.
    • 2009 February 6, Michael J. Benton, “The Red Queen and the Court Jester: Species Diversity and the Role of Biotic and Abiotic Factors Through Time”, in Science[1], volume 323, number 5915, DOI:10.1126/science.1157719, pages 728-732:
      In particular, dinosaurs did not participate in the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution, some 130 to 100 Ma, when flowering plants, leaf-eating insects, social insects, squamates, and many other modern groups radiated substantially.

HyponymsEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

squamate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of squamare
  2. second-person plural imperative of squamare
  3. feminine plural of squamato

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

squāmāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of squāmātus