See also: Reptile and réptile

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Middle English reptil, from Old French reptile, from Late Latin rēptile, neuter of reptilis (creeping), from Latin rēpō (to creep), from Proto-Indo-European *rep- (to creep, slink) (Pokorny; Watkins, 1969).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

reptile (plural reptiles)

  1. A cold-blooded vertebrate of the class Reptilia.
  2. (figuratively) A mean or grovelling person.
    • This work may, indeed, be considered as a great creation of our own; and for a little reptile of a critic to presume to find fault with any of its parts, without knowing the manner in which the whole is connected, and before he comes to the final catastrophe, is a most presumptuous absurdity.
    • Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers
      "That reptile," whispered Pott, catching Mr. Pickwick by the arm, and pointing towards the stranger. "That reptile — Slurk, of the Independent!"

HyponymsEdit

Related termsEdit


TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

reptile (not comparable)

  1. Creeping; moving on the belly, or by means of small and short legs.
  2. Grovelling; low; vulgar.
    a reptile race or crew; reptile vices
    • Burke
      There is also a false, reptile prudence, the result not of caution, but of fear.
    • Coleridge
      And dislodge their reptile souls / From the bodies and forms of men.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

NounEdit

reptile f (plural reptiles)

  1. reptile

LatinEdit