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See also: stamină

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin stāmina, plural of stāmen.

NounEdit

stamina (uncountable)

  1. The energy and strength for continuing to do something over a long period of time; power of sustained exertion, or resistance to hardship, illness etc.
    He has a lot of stamina. I suppose that is why he can run for a long time.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

stamina pl (plural only)

  1. (obsolete) The basic elements of a thing; rudimentary structures or qualities.

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

stamina

  1. (rare) plural of stamen
    • 1790, William Curtis, The Botanical Magazine, Or, Flower-Garden Displayed, Volume 3, 2006 Gutenberg eBook edition,
      In the specimens we have examined, and which perhaps have been rendered luxuriant by culture, the number of stamina has been from twelve to sixteen; of styles, from six to eight; of flowers on the same stalk, from one to eight.
    • 1832 December 8, Spirit of Discovery, in The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Number 579, 2005 Gutenberg eBook edition,
      The gay flowers of the hibiscus tiliaceus, as well as the splendid huth or Barringtonia speciosa, covered with its beautiful flowers, the petals of which are white, and the edges of the stamina delicately tinged with pink, give to the trees when in full bloom a magnificent appearance; the hibiscus rosa-chinensis, or kowa of the natives also grows in luxuriance and beauty.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

NounEdit

stamina (uncountable)

  1. stamina

LatinEdit

NounEdit

stāmina

  1. nominative plural of stāmen
  2. accusative plural of stāmen
  3. vocative plural of stāmen

ReferencesEdit

  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “stamina”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre