Open main menu

Wiktionary β

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Stentor +‎ -ian, from Ancient Greek Στέντωρ (Sténtōr). Stentor was the herald of the Greek forces in the Iliad, noted for his loud voice.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

stentorian (comparative more stentorian, superlative most stentorian)

  1. (of a voice) Loud, powerful, booming, suitable for giving speeches to large crowds.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter VIII
      There seemed no one to dispute his claims when he said, or rather shouted, in stentorian tones: "I am Tsa. This is my she. Who wishes her more than Tsa?"
    • 1922: James Joyce, Ulysses,
      The Irish Caruso-Garibaldi was in superlative form and his stentorian notes were heard to the greatest advantage in the time-honoured anthem sung as only our citizen can sing it.
    • 1938: William Faulkner, The Unvanquished,
      Giving us a last embracing and comprehensive glance he drew it, already pivoting Jupiter on the tight snaffle; his hair tossed beneath the cocked hat, the sabre flashed and glinted; he cried, not loud yet stentorian: "Trot! Canter! Charge!"
  2. (by extension) Stern, authoritarian; demanding of respect.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit