EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Of obscure origin. Cognate with Scots strunt (spirits, whisky, toddy).

NounEdit

strunt (countable and uncountable, plural strunts)

  1. (Scotland, uncountable) Spirituous liquor; alcoholic drink.
    • 1785, Robert Burns, Halloween
      Syne, wi' a social glass o' strunt, / They parted aff careerin / Fu' blythe that night.
  2. (Scotland, countable) A drink of spirits; a dram.
  3. (Britain, dialect, countable) A sulky fit; sullenness.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Compare Middle High German strunze (stump).

NounEdit

strunt (plural strunts)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) A tail or rump
  2. (Britain, dialectal) Anything short or contracted

Etymology 3Edit

From Scots strunt (human faeces, dung), from Dutch stront or Low German strunt, ultimately from Proto-West Germanic *strunt (dirt, filth, dung).

NounEdit

strunt (uncountable)

  1. (Britain, dialectal, Scotland) faeces, dung
  2. (Britain, dialectal) Foul air; a black, suffocating damp in a colliery

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German strunt, from Old Saxon *strunt, from Proto-West Germanic *strunt.

NounEdit

strunt n

  1. nonsense; that which is not worth paying attention to

DeclensionEdit

Declension of strunt 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative strunt struntet
Genitive strunts struntets

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit