See also: liqueur

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English licour, from Anglo-Norman licour, from Latin liquor (fluidity, liquidness, a fluid, a liquid), from liquere (to be fluid or liquid); see liquid. Doublet of liqueur.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

liquor (countable and uncountable, plural liquors)

  1. (obsolete) A liquid, a fluid.
  2. (obsolete) A drinkable liquid.
  3. A liquid obtained by cooking meat or vegetables (or both).
    Synonyms: stock, (American English) pot liquor, broth, bouillon
  4. (UK, cooking) A parsley sauce commonly served with traditional pies and mash.
  5. (chiefly US, Canada, Australia) Strong alcoholic drink derived from fermentation and distillation; more broadly, any alcoholic drink.
    Synonyms: (British and Australasian English) spirits, hard liquor, hard drink, strong drink
    • 1879, Chas. McArmor, The New Handbook of Vienna [] [1], 2nd edition, Otto Maass, page 106:
      Here the proprietor has had the good sense of holding on to the good old fashion of giving his customers their moneyworth of good wines and liquors.
  6. In process industry, a liquid in which a desired reaction takes place, e.g. pulping liquor is a mixture of chemicals and water which breaks wood into its components, thus facilitating the extraction of cellulose.
  7. A liquid in which something has been steeped.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

  It has been requested that this entry be merged with spirits(+).

Verb edit

liquor (third-person singular simple present liquors, present participle liquoring, simple past and past participle liquored)

  1. (intransitive) To drink liquor, usually to excess.
  2. (transitive) To cause someone to drink liquor, usually to excess.
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To grease.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for “liquor”, in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, Springfield, Mass.: G. & C. Merriam, 1913, →OCLC.)

References edit

Latin edit

Etymology 1 edit

From liqueō (I am liquid, fluid) +‎ -or.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

liquor m (genitive liquōris); third declension

  1. fluidity, liquidity
  2. liquid, fluid
Declension edit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative liquor liquōrēs
Genitive liquōris liquōrum
Dative liquōrī liquōribus
Accusative liquōrem liquōrēs
Ablative liquōre liquōribus
Vocative liquor liquōrēs
Related terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Catalan: licor
  • French: liqueur
  • Romanian: licoare
  • Italian: liquore
  • Occitan: liquor
  • Russian: ликёр (likjór)
  • Sicilian: licori m
  • Spanish: licor m

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

līquor (present infinitive līquī); third conjugation, deponent, no perfect or supine stem

  1. (intransitive) to be fluid or liquid
  2. (intransitive) to flow
  3. (intransitive) to melt, dissolve
Conjugation edit
   Conjugation of līquor (third conjugation, no supine stem, deponent, no perfect stem)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present līquor līqueris,
līquere
līquitur līquimur līquiminī līquuntur
imperfect līquēbar līquēbāris,
līquēbāre
līquēbātur līquēbāmur līquēbāminī līquēbantur
future līquar līquēris,
līquēre
līquētur līquēmur līquēminī līquentur
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present līquar līquāris,
līquāre
līquātur līquāmur līquāminī līquantur
imperfect līquerer līquerēris,
līquerēre
līquerētur līquerēmur līquerēminī līquerentur
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present līquere līquiminī
future līquitor līquitor līquuntor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives līquī
participles līquēns līquendus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
līquendī līquendō līquendum līquendō

Etymology 3 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

liquor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of liquō

References edit