superstitio

Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From superstō.

NounEdit

superstitiō f ‎(genitive superstitiōnis); third declension

  1. superstition

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative superstitiō superstitiōnēs
genitive superstitiōnis superstitiōnum
dative superstitiōnī superstitiōnibus
accusative superstitiōnem superstitiōnēs
ablative superstitiōne superstitiōnibus
vocative superstitiō superstitiōnēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • superstitio” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • superstitio” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • superstition has taken possession of their souls: superstitio mentes occupavit (Verr. 4. 51. 113)
    • to be tinged with superstition: superstitione imbutum esse
    • to be the slave of superstition: superstitione teneri, constrictum esse, obligatum esse
    • to absolutely annihilate superstition: superstitionem funditus tollere
    • to destroy superstition root and branch: superstitionem radicitus or penitus evellere
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