tentation

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French tentation, from Latin tentatio, alternative form of temptatio. See temptation.

NounEdit

tentation (countable and uncountable, plural tentations)

  1. Obsolete form of temptation.
    • 1646/50, Sir Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica:
      Whether there were any policie in the devil to tempt them [Adam and Eve] before conjunction, or whether the issue before tentation might in justice have suffered with those after, we leave it unto the Lawyer.
  2. (obsolete) A mode of adjusting or operating by repeated trials or experiments[1].

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1874, Edward H. Knight, American Mechanical Dictionary

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, borrowed from Ecclesiastical Latin tentātiō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɑ̃.ta.sjɔ̃/
  • (file)

NounEdit

tentation f (plural tentations)

  1. temptation

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

tentation (plural tentationes)

  1. temptation

Related termsEdit