See also: Experiment

English

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Etymology

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From Middle English experiment, from Old French esperiment (French expérience), from Latin experimentum (experience, attempt, experiment), from experior (to experience, to attempt), itself from ex + *perior, in turn from Proto-Indo-European *per-.

Pronunciation

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  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪkˈspɛɹ.ɪ.mənt/, /ɛkˈspɛɹ.ɪ.mənt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪkˈspɛɹ.ə.mənt/, /ɪkˈspɪɹ.ə.mənt/
    • Audio (US):(file)
  • Hyphenation: ex‧per‧i‧ment

Noun

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experiment (plural experiments)

  1. A test under controlled conditions made to either demonstrate a known truth, examine the validity of a hypothesis, or determine the efficacy or likelihood of something previously untried.
    conduct an experiment
    carry out some experiments
    perform a scientific experiment
    • 1837, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], “The Laboratory”, in Ethel Churchill: Or, The Two Brides. [], volume II, London: Henry Colburn, [], →OCLC, page 327:
      From her childhood she had been accustomed to watch, and often to aid, in her uncle's chemical experiments; she was, therefore, not at a loss, as a complete novice in the science would have been.
    • 2019, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      South Korean officials announced last month that an experiment to create artificial rain did not provide the desired results.
      Audio (US):(file)
  2. (obsolete) Experience, practical familiarity with something.

Derived terms

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Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb

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experiment (third-person singular simple present experiments, present participle experimenting, simple past and past participle experimented)

  1. (intransitive) To conduct an experiment.
    We're going to experiment on rats.
    • 1951 October, “Models Assist Rolling Stock Design”, in Railway Magazine, page 647:
      As well as demonstrating operating facilities, full-size car body models are used for experimenting with new types of interior finish, systems of lighting, positioning of route diagrams and advertisements, and the best form of windscreens at doorways, and the height and location of handgrips and handrails.
    • 1978 August 19, David Brill, “California Here I Come!”, in Gay Community News, volume 6, number 5, page 10:
      Bob is a shameless tourist: Coit Tower, Fisherman's Wharf, Twin Peaks, ad infinitum. I think walking the streets with a map in hand looks dumb; experimenting is much more fun.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To experience; to feel; to perceive; to detect.
    • 1662 Thomas Salusbury, Galileo's Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems (Dialogue 2):
      The Earth, the which may have carried us about perpetually ... without our being ever able to experiment its rest.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To test or ascertain by experiment; to try out; to make an experiment on.
    • 1481, The Mirrour of the World, William Caxton, 1.5.22:
      Til they had experimented whiche was trewe, and who knewe most.

Derived terms

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Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References

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Catalan

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin experīmentum. First attested in 1460.[1]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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experiment m (plural experiments)

  1. experiment

Derived terms

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References

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  1. ^ experiment”, in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana, 2024

Further reading

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Czech

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin experīmentum.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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experiment m inan

  1. experiment
    Synonym: pokus
    provést experimentto perform an experiment

Declension

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Further reading

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  • experiment in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • experiment in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • experiment in Internetová jazyková příručka

Dutch

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Etymology

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From Middle Dutch experiment, from Old French experiment, from Latin experimentum.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˌɛks.peː.riˈmɛnt/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Hyphenation: ex‧pe‧ri‧ment
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

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experiment n (plural experimenten, diminutive experimentje n)

  1. experiment
    Synonyms: proef, test
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Descendants

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  • Indonesian: eksperimen

Occitan

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Etymology

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From Latin experīmentum.

Noun

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experiment m (plural experiments)

  1. experiment
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Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin experimentum.

Noun

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experiment n (plural experimente)

  1. experiment

Declension

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Swedish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin experīmentum, attested from 1682.[1]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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experiment n

  1. experiment

Declension

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Declension of experiment 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative experiment experimentet experiment experimenten
Genitive experiments experimentets experiments experimentens
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References

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