EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɹaɪəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪəl
  • Hyphenation: tri‧al

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English trial, triall, from Anglo-Norman trial, triel, from trier (to pick out, cull) + -al. More at English try.

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

trial (plural trials)

  1. An opportunity to test something out; a test.
    They will perform the trials for the new equipment next week.
  2. Appearance at judicial court in order to be examined.
  3. A difficult or annoying experience.
    That boy was a trial to his parents.
  4. A tryout to pick members of a team.
    soccer trials
  5. (ceramics) A piece of ware used to test the heat of a kiln.
  6. (Britain) An internal examination set by Eton College.
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

trial (not comparable)

  1. Pertaining to a trial or test.
  2. Attempted on a provisional or experimental basis.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

trial (third-person singular simple present trials, present participle (UK) trialling or (US) trialing, simple past and past participle (UK) trialled or (US) trialed)

  1. To carry out a series of tests on (a new product, procedure etc.) before marketing or implementing it.
    The warning system was extensively trialed before being fitted to all our vehicles.
    • 2020 April 22, “Network News: Bombardier resumes work at Derby Litchurch Lane”, in Rail, page 9:
      In the week beginning April 6, the company began trialling the new processes - these include greater spacing, split shifts, additional safety requirements and washing facilities.
  2. To try out (a new player) in a sports team.
    The team trialled a new young goalkeeper in Saturday's match, with mixed results.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from the noun, adjective, or verb trial

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin tri- (stem of trēs (three)) + -al, on the pattern of dual.

AdjectiveEdit

trial (not comparable)

  1. Characterized by having three (usually equivalent) components.
  2. Triple.
  3. (grammar) Pertaining to a language form referring to three of something, like people; contrast singular, dual and plural. (See Ambai language for an example.)
    No language has a trial number unless it has a dual.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English trial.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: tri‧al

NounEdit

trial m (plural trials, diminutive trialtje n)

  1. Cross with small but sturdy and very versatile motorcycles, cars or bicycles

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English trial.

NounEdit

trial m (invariable)

  1. (sports) trials (motorcycle etc)

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

trier (to try such as in a court of law) +‎ -al.

NounEdit

trial m (oblique plural triaus or triax or trials, nominative singular triaus or triax or trials, nominative plural trial)

  1. trial (legal procedure)

Usage notesEdit

  • due to lack of attestation, the precise meaning is uncertain

DescendantsEdit

  • English: trial

ReferencesEdit