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See also: ténus

Contents

EsperantoEdit

VerbEdit

tenus

  1. conditional of teni

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

tenus

  1. masculine plural of the past participle of tenir

AnagramsEdit


IdoEdit

VerbEdit

tenus

  1. conditional of tenar

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Italic *tenos, from Proto-Indo-European *ténos, from *ten- (to stretch, draw). Cognate with Sanskrit तनस् (tánas), Ancient Greek *τένος (*ténos) (attested in ἀτενής (atenḗs)), also with German Dohne which has the same meaning. More at teneō (hold, grasp).[1]

NounEdit

tenus n (genitive tenoris); third declension

  1. some sort of snare

DeclensionEdit

Third declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative tenus tenora
Genitive tenoris tenorum
Dative tenorī tenoribus
Accusative tenus tenora
Ablative tenore tenoribus
Vocative tenus tenora

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Italic *tenos, from Proto-Indo-European *ten- (to stretch, draw). The specific etymology is debated: De Vaan suggests that it is merely a petrified accusative of extent of the s-stem *tenos and rejects Meiser's suggestion that it stems from the Proto-Indo-European perfect participle *tn̥-wós.[1][2]

Alternative formsEdit

PostpositionEdit

tenus (with genitive and ablative)

  1. (with genitive and ablative) Right up to, as far as, just as far as
  2. (with ablative, of a process) Up to (a given stage of)
  3. (with genitive and ablative, of limitation) To the maximum extent of, within
  4. (Ecclesiastical Latin) Lengthwise, along

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • (perhaps) *ad tenus

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “teneō”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, pages 612-613
  2. ^ Gerhard Meiser (1998) Laut-und Formenlehre der lateinischen Sprache. Darmstadt. page 183.