See also: ténus

EsperantoEdit

VerbEdit

tenus

  1. conditional of teni

FrenchEdit

ParticipleEdit

tenus m pl

  1. masculine plural of the past participle of tenir

AnagramsEdit


IdoEdit

VerbEdit

tenus

  1. conditional of tenar

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Italic *tenos, from Proto-Indo-European *ténos, from *ten- (to stretch, draw). Cognate with Sanskrit तनस् (tánas), Ancient Greek *τένος (*ténos) (attested in ἀτενής (atenḗs)), also with German Dohne which has the same meaning. More at teneō (hold, grasp).[1]

NounEdit

tenus n (genitive tenoris); third declension

  1. some sort of snare or trap
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative tenus tenora
Genitive tenoris tenorum
Dative tenorī tenoribus
Accusative tenus tenora
Ablative tenore tenoribus
Vocative tenus tenora

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Italic *tenos, from Proto-Indo-European *ten- (to stretch, draw). The specific etymology is debated: De Vaan suggests that it is merely a petrified accusative of extent of the s-stem *tenos and rejects Meiser's suggestion that it stems from the Proto-Indo-European perfect participle *tn̥-wós.[1][2]

Alternative formsEdit

PostpositionEdit

tenus (with genitive and ablative)

  1. (with genitive and ablative) Right up to, as far as, just as far as
  2. (with ablative, of a process) Up to (a given stage of)
  3. (with genitive and ablative, of limitation) To the maximum extent of, within
  4. (Ecclesiastical Latin) Lengthwise, along
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • (perhaps) *ad tenus
    • Old Portuguese: até

ReferencesEdit

  • tĕnus1”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • tĕnus2”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • tenus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • tenus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • tĕnŭs 1 tĕnŭs in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • tĕnus 2 tĕnus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the water reaches to the waist: aqua est umbilīco tenus
  • tenus1 ~oris” on page 2120/2 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (2nd ed., 2012)
  • tenus2” on page 2120/2-3 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (2nd ed., 2012)
  • tenus” in Leo F. Stelten, editor (1995) Dictionary of ecclesiastical Latin: with an appendix of Latin expressions defined and clarified, Peabody, Mass.: Hendrickson Publishers
  1. 1.0 1.1 De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “teneō”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 612-613
  2. ^ Gerhard Meiser (1998) Laut-und Formenlehre der lateinischen Sprache. Darmstadt. page 183.