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See also: Snare

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English snare, from Old English sneare (a string; cord), from Proto-Germanic *snarhǭ (a sling; loop; noose). Cognate with Old Norse snara. Also related to German Schnur and Dutch snaar,snoer.

PronunciationEdit

 
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NounEdit

snare (plural snares)

  1. A trap made from a loop of wire, string, or leather.
  2. (rare) A mental or psychological trap; usually in the phrase a snare and a delusion.
    • Shakespeare
      If thou retire, the Dauphin, well appointed, / Stands with the snares of war to tangle thee.
    • 1719, Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe
      ...and I had now lived two years under this uneasiness, which, indeed, made my life much less comfortable than it was before, as may be well imagined by any who know what it is to live in the constant snare of the fear of man.
  3. (veterinary) A loop of cord used in obstetric cases, to hold or to pull a fetus from the mother animal.
  4. (music) A set of chains strung across the bottom of a drum to create a rattling sound.
  5. (music) A snare drum.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

snare (third-person singular simple present snares, present participle snaring, simple past and past participle snared)

  1. To catch or hold, especially with a loop.
    • Milton
      Lest that too heavenly form [] snare them.
    • Shakespeare
      The mournful crocodile / With sorrow snares relenting passengers.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

snare

  1. definite singular of snar
  2. plural form of snar

Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

snare

  1. definite singular of snar
  2. plural form of snar

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

snare

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of snar.