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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ther, thar, tharr, tharf, from Old English þearf, from Proto-Germanic *þarf, first and third person singular form of Proto-Germanic *þurbaną (to need, require), from Proto-Indo-European *terp- (to satiate, satisfy). Cognate with Dutch durf (dare, verb), German darf (may, verb), Norwegian tarv (need, verb), Icelandic þarf (need, verb).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

thair (third-person singular simple present thair, present participle -, simple past and past participle thurst)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) To need; to be bound or obligated to do something.
    Ye thair nae ga (you don't need to go). Ye thurst nae scraugh sa lood (you didn't need to scream so loud).
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

AdverbEdit

thair (comparative more thair, superlative most thair)

  1. Archaic spelling of there.

Etymology 3Edit

PronounEdit

thair

  1. Archaic spelling of their.
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

thair

  1. Lenited form of tair.

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tair thair dtair
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Middle EnglishEdit

DeterminerEdit

thair

  1. Alternative form of þeir

ReferencesEdit


Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

thair

  1. Lenited form of tair.

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
tair thair tair
pronounced with /d(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.