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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French titubant, present participle of tituber, from Latin titubāre (falter), present active infinitive of titubō.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈtɪtəbənt/, /ˈtɪtʃəbənt/

AdjectiveEdit

titubant (comparative more titubant, superlative most titubant)

  1. stumbling, staggering; with the movement of one who is tipsy
    • 1896, Robert Louis Stevenson, Macaire, act i, scene 2 (stage directions)
      To these, by the door L. C., the CURATE and the NOTARY, arm in arm; the latter owl-like and titubant
    • 1928, Acta Psychiatrica et Neurologica‎, volume 3, page 65
      His walk had become titubant.
    • 1948, Karl Pearson, Treasury of Human Inheritance: Nervous Diseases and Muscular Dystrophies‎, page 253
      her feet showed the typical Friedreich's deformity; her speech was drawling and monotonous; her gait was staggering and titubant

SynonymsEdit

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CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

titubant

  1. present participle of titubar

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

titubant

  1. present participle of tituber
  2. (preceded by en) gerund of tituber

LatinEdit