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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

By analogy to the word liar for one who lies.

NounEdit

truar (plural truars)

  1. One who always tells the truth.
    • 1980, David H. Ahl, Computers in Mathematics: A Sourcebook of Ideas, page 42:
      The third person is either an Anania (liar) or a Diogene (truar).
    • 2012, Wayne A. Wickelgren, How to Solve Mathematical Problems, →ISBN:
      From this information, can you determine how many of the three are liars and how many are truars?
    • 2013 -, David Gries & ‎Fred B. Schneider, A Logical Approach to Discrete Math, →ISBN, page 106:
      The country of Marr is inhabited by two types of people: liars always lie and truars always tell the truth —sounds like a knight-knave problem, eh?

Usage notesEdit

This term is used almost exclusively for logic puzzles.

AnagramsEdit


DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin trahere, present active infinitive of trahō (I pull).

VerbEdit

truar

  1. to throw