EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English toile, from Anglo-Norman toille, tuille, taken to be variants of Old French tieulle (modern French tuile, from Latin tēgula, and thus a doublet of tile and tuile. The French term occurs in only one medieval work and the English term in only two (one a translation of the French work),[1] where the meaning is less than clear; it has been suggested that the interpretation of the term as referring to an element of armor is an error by 1800s antiquarians.[2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tuille (plural tuilles)

  1. (historical) An armor plate hanging down from the breastplate or fauld to cover the thigh, either below or as part of a tasse.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ tuille”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  2. ^ Francis Michael Kelly, Shakespearian Costume (1970)

FinnishEdit

NounEdit

tuille

  1. Allative plural form of tuki.

IrishEdit

VerbEdit

tuille

  1. present subjunctive analytic of tuille

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tuille thuille dtuille
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.