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See also: tuilé

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French tuile (tile).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tuile

  1. A type of thin, papery cookie, often bent into fancy shapes
    • 2009, January 28, “Elaine Sciolino”, in With Cowbells and Oxtails, Culinary Olympics Begin[1]:
      Finally, there was a grilled rib of beef in an herb and pistachio crust that sat on [] a cylindrical garnish of layered sweet potato and red pepper purée, pearls of glazed garlic and a thin Parmesan tuile.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Metathesis of Old French tiule, from Latin tēgula. Compare Italian tegola. Compare also Middle French the Champenois dialect/language teille, evolved from Vulgar Latin *tegla.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tuile f (plural tuiles)

  1. tile
  2. (colloquial) bad luck, misfortune
    Synonyms: accident, imprévu
    Il m’est arrivé une tuile.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
  3. (cooking) tuile (thin cookie)

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

tuile

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tuiler
  2. third-person singular present indicative of tuiler
  3. second-person singular imperative of tuiler

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tuile f (genitive singular tuile, nominative plural tuilte)

  1. verbal noun of tuil
  2. flood, flow

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tuile thuile dtuile
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tēgula.

NounEdit

tuile f (plural tuiles)

  1. (Jersey) tile

Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

tuile

  1. genitive singular of tuil