Contents

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish úar, from Latin hōra ‎(hour), from Ancient Greek ὥρα ‎(hṓra, time, period), from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₁- ‎(year, season).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

uair f ‎(genitive singular uaire, nominative plural uaireanta)

  1. hour
  2. time (instance or occurrence)

DeclensionEdit

Usage notesEdit

After dhá ‎(two), the singular form is used. After a numeral higher than two, a count plural uaire is used. This form undergoes h-prothesis after trí through . It is eclipsed from seacht up to deich.

  • dhá uair‎ ― two hours
  • trí huaire‎ ― three hours
  • seacht n-uaire‎ ― seven hours

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
uair n-uair huair t-uair
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • 2 úar, úair” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • “uair” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 1927, by Patrick S. Dinneen.
  • "uair" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish úar, from Latin hōra ‎(hour), from Ancient Greek ὥρα ‎(hṓra, time, period), from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₁- ‎(year, season).

NounEdit

uair f ‎(genitive singular uarach, plural uairean)

  1. hour
  2. o'clock
  3. time (instance or occurrence)
    B’ e a’ chiad uair a chunnaic mi iad.
    That was the first time I saw them.
    Choisinn e ceithir uair ann.
    He walked there four times.
    Seo an uair mu dheireadh a tha mi gad chuideachadh!
    This is the last time I’m helping you!
    uair no dhà
    once or twice
    uair a thìde no dhà
    (for) an hour or two

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • 2 úar, úair” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
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