Last modified on 11 May 2015, at 08:36

CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of saber

GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

  1. second-person singular imperative of ser

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronounEdit

(3d sing. masc. conjunctive)

  1. he; (referring to a masculine noun) it
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish, from Proto-Celtic, from Proto-Indo-European *swéḱs. Compare Scottish Gaelic sia, Manx shey.

NumeralEdit

  1. six
Usage notesEdit

Can be followed by either the singular or the plural form of the noun it modifies. Triggers lenition of a following singular noun. Prefixes h- to a following vowel-initial plural noun.

Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
  • seisear (used to modify nouns referring to human beings)

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
shé
after "an", tsé
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin .

PronounEdit

  1. oneself, himself, herself

Derived termsEdit

Usage notesEdit

  • Becomes se when in combination with verbs or other pronouns.
  • Becomes si when part of a reflexive verb.

LadinEdit

VerbEdit

  1. first-person singular present indicative of savei

PronounEdit

  1. oneself, himself, herself

NormanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin siccus, from Proto-Indo-European *seik-.

AdjectiveEdit

m (f sècque, m plural sés, f plural sècques)

  1. (Jersey) dry
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French seir, soir, from Latin sērō (at a late hour, late), from sērus (late).

NounEdit

 m (plural sés)

  1. (Jersey) evening
Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old French sel, from Latin sāl.

NounEdit

 m (plural sés)

  1. (Jersey) salt
Alternative formsEdit

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese see, from Latin sēdēs (seat), from sedeō (I sit), from Proto-Indo-European *sed- (to sit).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

f (plural sés)

  1. (Roman Catholicism) see (the cathedral and region under the jurisdiction of a bishop)

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See saber

VerbEdit

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of saber.
    No . — “I do not know.”

Etymology 2Edit

See ser

VerbEdit

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of ser.

Etymology 3Edit

See

InterjectionEdit

  1. (colloquial, Chile) yes

Sranan TongoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch zee.

NounEdit

  1. sea

WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sāl, salem.

NounEdit

 ?

  1. salt