English

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Etymology

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un- +‎ thread

Verb

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unthread (third-person singular simple present unthreads, present participle unthreading, simple past and past participle unthreaded)

  1. (transitive) To draw or remove a thread from.
    • 1820, John Keats, “Isabella; or, The Pot of Basil. A Story from Boccaccio.”, in Lamia, Isabella, the Eve of St. Agnes, and Other Poems, London: [] [Thomas Davison] for Taylor and Hessey, [], →OCLC, stanza XXXVII, page 67:
      Its eyes, though wild, were still all dewy bright / With love, and kept all phantom fear aloof / From the poor girl by magic of their light, / The while it did unthread the horrid woof / Of the late darken'd time,— []
    • 1832, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Heath's Book of Beauty, 1833, The Talisman, page 62:
      "Good and evil! good and evil!" thought he; "ye are mingled inextricably in the web of our being; and who may unthread the darker yarn?"
  2. (transitive) To loosen the connections of.
  3. (transitive) To make one's way through.

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