English

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Pronunciation

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  • (UK) IPA(key): /əˈpɒl.stə(ɹ)/, /əˈpɐl.stə(ɹ)/

Etymology 1

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Back-formation from upholsterer (tradesman who finishes furniture),[1] from Middle English upholdester, from Middle English upholder (dealer in small goods), from upholden (to repair, uphold); equivalent to uphold +‎ -ster.

Verb

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upholster (third-person singular simple present upholsters, present participle upholstering, simple past and past participle upholstered)

  1. (transitive) To fit padding, stuffing, springs, webbing and fabric covering to (furniture).
Derived terms
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Translations
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Etymology 2

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From Middle English upholdester, upholster; equivalent to uphold +‎ -ster.[2]

Alternative forms

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Noun

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upholster (plural upholsters)

  1. (archaic) An upholder, a dealer in secondhand furniture and clothes; an upholsterer; a tradesman who finishes furniture.
Derived terms
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References

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  1. ^ James A. H. Murray [et al.], editors (1884–1928), “Upho·lster, v.”, in A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (Oxford English Dictionary), volumes X, Part 1 (Ti–U), London: Clarendon Press, →OCLC, page 426, column 2:Back-formation from Upholsterer or Upholstery.
  2. ^ James A. H. Murray [et al.], editors (1884–1928), “† Upho·lster, sb.”, in A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (Oxford English Dictionary), volumes X, Part 1 (Ti–U), London: Clarendon Press, →OCLC, page 426, column 2:f. Uphold v. + -ster.

Anagrams

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