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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French varlet. Compare valet.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

varlet (plural varlets)

  1. (obsolete) A servant or attendant.
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 2, ch. 8, The Electon
      The Winchester Manorhouse has fled bodily, like a Dream of the old Night [] . House and people, royal and episcopal, lords and varlets, where are they?
  2. (historical) Specifically, a youth acting as a knight's attendant at the beginning of his training for knighthood.
  3. (archaic) A rogue or scoundrel.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, p. 410:
      My lady to be called a nasty Scotch wh–re by such a varlet!—To be sure I wish I had knocked his brains out with the punchbowl.
    • 1886, Henry James, The Bostonians.
      He was false, cunning, vulgar, ignoble; the cheapest kind of human product [] The white, puffy mother, with the high forehead, in the corner there, looked more like a lady; but if she were one, it was all the more shame to her to have mated with such a varlet, Ransom said to himself, making use, as he did generally, of terms of opprobrium extracted from the older English literature.
  4. (obsolete, card games) The jack.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

varlet m (oblique plural varlez or varletz, nominative singular varlez or varletz, nominative plural varlet)

  1. Alternative form of vaslet