verdure

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French verdure.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

verdure (countable and uncountable, plural verdures)

  1. The greenness of lush or growing vegetation; also: the vegetation itself.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare
      [] now he was / The ivy which had hid my princely trunk, / And suck'd my verdure out on't.
    • 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, Modern Library Edition (1995), page 142
      The five weeks which she had now passed in Kent had made a great difference in the country, and every day was adding to the verdure of the early trees.
    • 1912 January, Zane Grey, chapter 1, in Riders of the Purple Sage: A Novel, New York, N.Y.; London: Harper & Brothers Publishers, OCLC 6868219:
      To her belonged Amber Spring, the water which gave verdure and beauty to the village and made living possible on that wild purple upland waste.
    • 1952, Norman Lewis, Golden Earth:
      Through the brazen hours that followed high noon, we crept onwards through a tunnel of glittering verdure.
  2. (by extension) A condition of health and vigour.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

verdure (third-person singular simple present verdures, present participle verduring, simple past and past participle verdured)

  1. (transitive) To cover with verdure.

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

VerbEdit

verdure

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of verduren

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

vert +‎ -ure

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /vɛʁ.dyʁ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -yʁ

NounEdit

verdure f (plural verdures)

  1. verdure, greenness

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

verdure f pl

  1. plural of verdura