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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Old French vertible, from Latin vertibilis from the stem of vertō (I turn).

AdjectiveEdit

vertible (comparative more vertible, superlative most vertible)

  1. (obsolete) Able to turn or to be turned; changeable. [15th–17th CC.]
    • 1667, Henry More, Divine Dialogues, II.20:
      But were it not better that God Almighty should annihilate the Individuals of this middle vertible Order, as you call it, as soon as they lapse into Sin?

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Old French vertible, q.v.

AdjectiveEdit

vertible m or f (plural vertibles)

  1. turnable, able to be turned
  2. changeable, able to be changed

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin vertibilis. First known attestation 1282 in Le livre du gouvernement des roys et des princes by Henri de Gauchi.

AdjectiveEdit

vertible m (oblique and nominative feminine singular vertible)

  1. changeable; able to be changed

DescendantsEdit