wan-

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English wan-, from Old English wan- ‎(prefix expressing privation or negation), from Proto-Germanic *wanaz ‎(lacking, missing, deficient), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)wAn-, *wān- ‎(empty). Cognate with Dutch wan-, German Wahn-, Danish, Swedish and Icelandic van-, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌽𐍃 ‎(wans, lacking, deficient). More at want.

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

wan-

  1. (no longer productive except in Scotland) Preceding nouns and adjectives with the sense ‘bad, un-
    Examples: wanhope, wanrest, wanton

Derived termsEdit



DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch wan-, from Old Dutch *wan-, from Proto-Germanic *wana-, a prefixing form of *wanaz.

PrefixEdit

wan-

  1. Preceding nouns, verbs and adjectives with the sense ‘bad, un-’.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit



Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *wanaz ‎(lacking), from Proto-Indo-European *we-no- ‎(absent, lacking, without), *lang-, from Proto-Indo-European *eue- ‎(to leave, abandon). Akin to Old Saxon wan- (Dutch wan-), Old High German wan- (German wahn-), Old Norse van- (Swedish van-), Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌽𐍃 ‎(wans, wanting), Old English wanian ‎(to lessen, wane), Latin vānus. More at wane.

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

wan-

  1. Forming nouns and adjectives with the sense provation or negation, ‘lacking, without; un-, wan-’.

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *wanaz ‎(lacking), from Proto-Indo-European *we-no- ‎(absent, lacking, without), *lang-, from Proto-Indo-European *eue- ‎(to leave, abandon).

PrefixEdit

wan-

  1. Forming nouns and adjectives with the sense provation or negation, ‘lacking, without; un-, wan-’.

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English wan-. Cognate with German wahn-, Swedish van-.

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

wan-

  1. Preceding nouns and adjectives with the sense ‘bad, un-
    Examples: wanhope, wanrest
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