See also: wårder and Warder

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

warder (plural warders)

  1. A guard, especially in a prison.
  2. (archaic) A truncheon or staff carried by a king or commander, used to signal commands.
    • 1595, Samuel Daniel, Civil Wars, in The Poetical Works of Mr. Samuel Daniel, Volume II, London: R. Gosling, 1718, Book I, stanza 62, p. 25,[3]
      When, lo! the king chang’d suddenly his Mind,
      Casts down his Warder to arrest them there;
    • c. 1595, William Shakespeare, Richard II, Act I, Scene 3,[4]
      Stay, the king hath thrown his warder down.
    • 1764, Horace Walpole, The Castle of Otranto, London: Tho. Lownds, Chapter 3, p. 91,[5]
      If thou dost not comply with these just demands, he defies thee to single combat to the last extremity. And so saying, the Herald cast down his warder.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

warder

  1. (Old Northern French, Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of guarder

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-d, *-ds, *-dt are modified to t, z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.


PicardEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French warder.

VerbEdit

warder

  1. to keep

ConjugationEdit