EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally the simple past and past participle of wend.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

went

  1. simple past tense of go
  2. (nonstandard) past participle of go
    • 1671, Elisha Coles, chapter 7, in ΧΡΙΣΤΟΛΟΓΙΑ: Or, a Metrical Paraphraſe on the Hiſtory of Our Lord and Saviour Jeſus Chriſt : Dedicated to His Univerſal Church[1], page 22:
      When they arrived whither they were bent, / He made as if he farther would have went. / But they conſtrain'd him, ſaying, Night is near; / Abide with us; and ſo he tarry'd there.
    • 1851, Douglas Nix, Report of the Great Conspiracy Case [] [2], Advertiser and Free Pres, page 145:
      I went from Filley's to Fitch's house, to talk of oxen; no one went with me; might have went to the mill; don,t remember whether I rode back to Laycock's or not to dinner.
    • 2010 June 14, Douglas Nix, Al-Qaeda Hunter[3], Xlibris, →ISBN, page 22:
      I just sat around and watched, then decided to go see Safid; we planned to study that day, but first we had a good ride around town. We must have went fifteen miles, and Safid was ready to sit and study; we went to a little park and started working.
  3. (archaic) simple past tense and past participle of wend

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

went (plural wents)

  1. (obsolete) A course; a way, a path; a journey.
    • (Can we date this quote by Chaucer and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      At a turning of a wente.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.5:
      But here my wearie teeme, nigh over spent, / Shall breathe it selfe awhile after so long a went.

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

NounEdit

went

  1. Soft mutation of gwent.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

went

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of wennen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of wennen

ScotsEdit

VerbEdit

went

  1. simple past tense of gan