See also: Went

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally the simple past and past participle of wend, but now the past of go due to suppletion.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

went

  1. simple past tense of go
  2. (nonstandard) past participle of go
    • 1671, Elisha Coles, chapter 7, in ΧΡΙΣΤΟΛΟΓΙΑ: Or, a Metrical Paraphraſe on the Hiſtory of Our Lord and Saviour Jeſus Chriſt : Dedicated to His Univerſal Church[1], page 22:
      When they arrived whither they were bent, / He made as if he farther would have went. / But they conſtrain'd him, ſaying, Night is near; / Abide with us; and ſo he tarry'd there.
    • 1851, Douglas Nix, Report of the Great Conspiracy Case [] [2], Advertiser and Free Press, page 145:
      I went from Filley's to Fitch's house, to talk of oxen; no one went with me; might have went to the mill; don,t remember whether I rode back to Laycock's or not to dinner.
    • 2010 June 14, Douglas Nix, Al-Qaeda Hunter[3], Xlibris, →ISBN, page 22:
      I just sat around and watched, then decided to go see Safid; we planned to study that day, but first we had a good ride around town. We must have went fifteen miles, and Safid was ready to sit and study; we went to a little park and started working.
  3. (archaic) simple past tense and past participle of wend

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

went (plural wents)

  1. (obsolete) A course; a way, a path; a journey.
    • c. 1374-1385, Geoffrey Chaucer, Hous of Fame
      At a turninge of a wente.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.5:
      But here my wearie teeme, nigh over spent, / Shall breathe it selfe awhile after so long a went.

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

NounEdit

went

  1. Soft mutation of gwent.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

went

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of wennen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of wennen

ScotsEdit

VerbEdit

went

  1. simple past tense of gan