EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡæn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æn

Etymology 1Edit

Perhaps connected with Middle English gane, or possibly from Welsh geneu, Cornish ganau (mouth).[1]

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

gan (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete, UK, thieves' cant) Mouth.
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[Chapter III]”, in Ulysses, London: The Egoist Press, published October 1922, OCLC 2297483:
      White thy fambles, red thy gan
      And thy quarrons dainty is.
      Couch a hogshead with me then.
      In the darkmans clip and kiss.

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

gan

  1. (archaic) simple past tense of gin

Etymology 3Edit

Probably a variant of gang, from Middle English gangen, from Old English gangan (to step; walk; go).

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

gan (third-person singular simple present gans, present participle gannin, simple past went, past participle gone)

  1. (Northumbria) To go.
    • 2011, Chris Dockerty, Ramblings of a Geordie:
      The one problem I had here was my broad Geordie accent which the teachers tried their hardest to make me lose. I couldn't understand their problem with it because I could understand myself. Whenever I told them, "Am gannin yem", they would say, "No, Christopher. It's not "am gannin yem", it's "I am going home".

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Frank Graham (1987) The New Geordie Dictionary, →ISBN
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [2]
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[3]
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [4]
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN

AnagramsEdit


Antillean CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French gant.

NounEdit

gan

  1. glove

BambaraEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gan

  1. to jump

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

gan

  1. hot

VerbEdit

gan

  1. (transitive) to heat up

ReferencesEdit


DharugEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gan

  1. reptile
  2. (specifically) goanna

ReferencesEdit

  • Jakelin Troy (1993) The Sydney Language, Canberra, →ISBN, page 53

Dutch Low SaxonEdit

VerbEdit

gan

  1. Alternative spelling of gaon

GaroEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Bengali গান (gan).

NounEdit

gan

  1. song

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish cen (besides; without), from Proto-Celtic *kina (on this side of); compare Middle Welsh am-gen (otherwise), Breton ken (otherwise).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

gan (plus nominative, triggers no mutation in specific references but lenition in general references)

  1. without
  2. not (in conjunction with a verbal noun)

Usage notesEdit

  • In standardised Irish, triggers lenition (except of d, s, t) of unmodified nouns, e.g. gan phingin (without a penny). Does not trigger lenition of modified nouns, e.g. gan pingin ina phóca (without a penny in his pocket). In the meaning ‘not’, does not trigger lenition of either a verbal noun or on the direct object of the verbal noun, e.g. gan ceannach ("not to buy"), gan pingin a shaothrú ("not to earn a penny").

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

gan

  1. Rōmaji transcription of がん
  2. Rōmaji transcription of ガン

LatvianEdit

ConjunctionEdit

gan

  1. both, and

Usage notesEdit

Used in pairs: gan jauna, gan skaista "both young and beautiful"


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

gan

  1. Nonstandard spelling of gān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of gǎn.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of gàn.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English ġeġn.

PrepositionEdit

gan

  1. Alternative form of gain (against)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English gān.

VerbEdit

gan

  1. (Early Middle English, Northern) Alternative form of gon (to go)

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English gān, ġegān.

VerbEdit

gan

  1. Alternative form of gon (gone)

Northern KurdishEdit

VerbEdit

gan (present stem -gê-)

  1. to have sexual intercourse with somebody, to fuck somebody

NounEdit

gan ?

  1. having sex, fucking

Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *gān.

VerbEdit

gān

  1. to go

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Dutch: gâen
    • Dutch: gaan
      • Afrikaans: gaan
      • Javindo: ha, haat
      • Jersey Dutch: xân, xâne
      • Petjo: gaan, haan
    • Limburgish: gaon

Further readingEdit

  • gān”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *gān, from Proto-Germanic *gāną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeh₁- (to leave). The verb was defective in Germanic and may only have existed in the present tense.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gān

  1. to go
  2. to walk

Usage notesEdit

  • The expected present participle, gānde, is very rare. Instead gangende is almost always used, from the synonym gangan: Līf nis būtan gangendu sċadu ("Life is but a walking shadow").

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *gān.

VerbEdit

gān

  1. to go

InflectionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Saterland Frisian: geen (simple past, past participle of gunge)
  • West Frisian: gean

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *gān.

VerbEdit

gān

  1. to go

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit


SalarEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Turkmen gan.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Dazhuang, Mengda, Hanbahe, Jiezi, Gaizi, Xunhua, Qinghai, Ili, Yining, Xinjiang) IPA(key): [qɑn]
  • (Chahandusi, Xunhua, Qinghai) IPA(key): [qɑːn]

NounEdit

gan

  1. blood

Derived termsEdit

  • gana (to bleed)

ReferencesEdit

  • Tenishev, Edhem (1976), “gan”, in Stroj salárskovo jazyká [Grammar of Salar], Moscow: Nauka, page 460
  • Ma, Chengjun; Han, Lianye; Ma, Weisheng (December 2010), “gan”, in 米娜瓦尔 艾比布拉 (Minavar Abibra), editor, 撒维汉词典 (Sāwéihàncídiǎn) [Salar-Uyghur-Chinese dictionary], 1st edition, Beijing, →ISBN, page 218
  • 马伟 (Ma Wei), 朝克 (Chao Ke) (2014), “gan”, in 撒拉语366条会话读本 [Salar 366 Conversation Reader], 1st edition, 社会科学文献出版社 (Social Science Literature Press), →ISBN, page 109
  • Yakup, Abdurishid (2002), “gan”, in An Ili Salar Vocabulary: Introduction and a Provisional Salar-English Lexicon, Tokyo: University of Tokyo, →ISBN, page 104

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Northern Middle English gan, from Old English gān (to go). Past tense supplied by Old English wenden (to wend).

VerbEdit

gan (third-person singular simple present gans, present participle gan, simple past went or wett, past participle been)

  1. to go

Scottish GaelicEdit

PronounEdit

gan

  1. them (direct object)
    A bheil sibh gan creidsinn?Do you believe them?

Usage notesEdit

  • Before words beginning with b, f, m or p gam is used instead.

Related termsEdit


SumerianEdit

RomanizationEdit

gan

  1. Romanization of 𒃶 (gan)

TernateEdit

EtymologyEdit

From older gani.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gan

  1. Alternative form of gani (louse)

ReferencesEdit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English gun.

NounEdit

gan

  1. gun

TurkmenEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *kiān (blood).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gan (definite accusative gany, plural ganlar)

  1. blood

DeclensionEdit


VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Vietic *t-kaːn, from Old Chinese (OC *s.kˤa[r]) (SV: can). Cognate with Chut [Rục] təkaːn¹ ("bold").

Displaced native lòm, now only found in the compounds đỏ lòm and chua lòm.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

(classifier ) gan

  1. (anatomy) a liver
  2. (figuratively) audacity; gall; balls
    to ganaudacious
    nhát gan / gan thỏ đếchicken

NounEdit

(classifier cây) gan

  1. (botany) Malus doumeri
    Synonym: sơn tra

AdjectiveEdit

gan

  1. hepatic
  2. courageous, brave, tough

Derived termsEdit

Derived terms

AnagramsEdit


VolapükEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gan (nominative plural gans)

  1. (male or female) goose

DeclensionEdit

HypernymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


WelshEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Welsh cant, from Proto-Celtic *kanta.[1] Cognate with Breton gant and Ancient Greek κατά (katá, against; downwards).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

gan (triggers soft mutation)

  1. with
    Synonyms: â, gyda, efo
  2. (North Wales) used with bod to indicate possession
    Mae gen i wallt hir.
    I have long hair.
    (literally, “Long hair is with me.”)
    Synonym: (South Wales) gyda
  3. by (after a passive construction)
    Cafodd y car ei ddwyn gan ddau llanc.
    The car was stolen by two youths.
  4. by (authorship)
  5. used with verbal noun to indicate an action simultaneous with that of the main verb, while, whilst
    • King, Gareth (1993) Modern Welsh: A Comprehensive Grammar (Routledge Grammars), London and New York: Routledge, →ISBN, page 131:
      Aeth o gwmpas y stafell gan ofyn yr un cwestiwn i bawb.
      He went around the room [while] asking everyone the same question.
Usage notesEdit

See [5] for more information.

InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gan

  1. Soft mutation of can.

NounEdit

gan

  1. Soft mutation of can.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
can gan nghan chan
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “gan”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

WolofEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gan (definite form gan gi)

  1. stranger
  2. guest

YorubaEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gàn

  1. (transitive) to disparage, criticize, belittle
    Synonyms: pẹ̀gàn, ṣáátá, ṣàbùkù, kẹ́gàn
    ọ̀tá mí gànmy enemy disparages me
Usage notesEdit
  • gan before a direct object
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gan

  1. (intransitive) to become stiff, to harden
    kankéré ti ganThe concrete has hardened
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gán

  1. (transitive) to stub, to clear (plants or a forest)
    Synonym: ṣán
    àgbẹ́ gán' igbóThe farmer cleared the forest
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gán

  1. to use something very sparingly
    Synonym: sún
    mo ń gán owó lòI am using money very sparingly
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gán

  1. to hit something with a thrown or spun object
    mo ń gán owó lòI am using money very sparingly
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 6Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gán

  1. to tack or stich something together
    Synonym: rán
    mo gán etí aṣọ pọ̀I hemmed the edge of the cloth together
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
  • gbá (to stich together the edges of a mat)

Etymology 7Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gán

  1. to snatch something in the air, especially with one hand
    Synonyms: hán, wọ́n
    mo fọwọ́ gán bọ́ọ̀lù náà pákóI used my hand to snatch the ball swiftly from the air
Derived termsEdit