Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See gin

VerbEdit

gan

  1. (archaic) simple past tense of gin

Etymology 2Edit

Probably a variant of gang, from Middle English gangen, from Old English gangan (to step; walk; go). More at gang.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

gan (third-person singular simple present gans, present participle gannin, simple past went, past participle gone)

  1. (obsolete outside Northumbria) To go.

ReferencesEdit

  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, →ISBN
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [1]
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[2]
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [3]
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN

AnagramsEdit


Antillean CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French gant.

NounEdit

gan

  1. glove

BambaraEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gan

  1. to jump

ReferencesEdit


Dutch Low SaxonEdit

VerbEdit

gan

  1. Alternative spelling of gaon

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish cen (besides; without), from Proto-Celtic *kina (besides); compare Middle Welsh am-gen (otherwise), Breton ken (otherwise).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

gan (plus nominative, triggers no mutation in specific references but lenition in general references)

  1. without
  2. not (in conjunction with a verbal noun)

Usage notesEdit

  • Triggers lenition of b, c, g, m, p on unmodified nouns, e.g. gan phingin (without a penny). Does not trigger lenition on modified nouns, e.g. gan pingin ina phóca (without a penny in his pocket). In the meaning ‘not’, does not trigger lenition on either a verbal noun or on the direct object of the verbal noun, e.g. gan ceannach ‘not to buy’, gan pingin a shaothrú ‘not to earn a penny’.
  • Unlike most Irish prepositions, gan governs the nominative, not the dative, and it does not form prepositional pronouns: gan an t-arán (without the bread), gan (without me).

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • "gan" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • cen” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • Entries containing “gan” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “gan” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

gan

  1. Rōmaji transcription of がん
  2. Rōmaji transcription of ガン

KurdishEdit

VerbEdit

gan (present stem -gê-)

  1. to have sex with somebody, to fuck somebody

NounEdit

gan ?

  1. having sex, fucking

LatvianEdit

ConjunctionEdit

gan

  1. both, and

Usage notesEdit

Used in pairs: gan jauna, gan skaista "both young and beautiful"


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

gan

  1. Nonstandard spelling of gān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of gán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of gǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of gàn.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English ġeġn.

PrepositionEdit

gan

  1. Alternative form of gain (against)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English gān.

VerbEdit

gan

  1. (Early Middle English, Northern) Alternative form of gon (to go)

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English gān, ġegān.

VerbEdit

gan

  1. Alternative form of gon (gone)

Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *gāną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeh₁- (to leave).

VerbEdit

gān

  1. to go

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • gān”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *gāną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeh₁- (to leave). The verb was defective in Germanic and may only have existed in the present tense.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gān

  1. to go, walk

ConjugationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *gāną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeh₁- (to leave).

VerbEdit

gān

  1. to go

InflectionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • North Frisian: (Mooring) gunge, (Föhr-Amrum) gung
  • Saterland Frisian: gunge
  • West Frisian: gean

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *gāną, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeh₁- (to leave).

VerbEdit

gān

  1. to go

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit


ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Northern Middle English gan, from Old English gān (to go). Past tense supplied by Old English wenden (to wend).

VerbEdit

gan (third-person singular present gans, present participle gan, past went or wett, past participle been)

  1. to go

Scottish GaelicEdit

PronounEdit

gan

  1. them (direct object)
    A bheil sibh gan creidsinn?Do you believe them?

Usage notesEdit

  • Before words beginning with b, f, m or p gam is used instead.

Related termsEdit


Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English gun.

NounEdit

gan

  1. gun

TurkmenEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Turkic *kiān (blood).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gan (definite accusative gany, plural ganlar)

  1. blood

DeclensionEdit


VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Vietic *t-kaːn, from Old Chinese (liver) (SV: can).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gan

  1. (anatomy) a liver
  2. (figuratively) audacity; gall; balls
    to gan
    audacious
    nhát gan / gan thỏ đế
    chicken

Derived termsEdit

Derived terms

VolapükEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gan (plural gans)

  1. (male or female) goose

DeclensionEdit

HypernymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


WelshEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

gan

  1. with
  2. by (authorship)
  3. (North Wales) to indicate possession
    Mae gen i wallt hir.
    I have long hair.
  4. used with verbal noun to indicate an action simultaneous with that of the main verb
    • 1993, Gareth King, Modern Welsh: A Comprehensive Grammar, London: Routledge, →ISBN, p. 131:
      Aeth o gwmpas y stafell gan ofyn yr un cwestiwn i bawb.
      He went around the room asking everyone the same question.
Usage notesEdit

See [4] for more information.

InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gan

  1. Soft mutation of can.

NounEdit

gan

  1. Soft mutation of can.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
can gan nghan chan
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

WolofEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

gan (definite form gan gi)

  1. stranger
  2. guest