EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English *whid, from Old English hwiþa, hwiþu (air, breeze) or from Old Norse hviða (gust of wind), both from Proto-Germanic *hwiþō (rush of wind), from Proto-Germanic *hwi- (to rush), from Proto-Indo-European *kwei- (to hiss, whistle, whisper). Cognate with Scots quhid (a squall, blast of wind).

NounEdit

whid (plural whids)

  1. A quick motion; a rapid, quiet movement, usually by small game.

VerbEdit

whid (third-person singular simple present whids, present participle whidding, simple past and past participle whidded)

  1. To move nimbly and with little noise, usually of small game.
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Perhaps from Old English cwide (word, speech).

NounEdit

whid (plural whids)

  1. (obsolete, Scotland) A lie; a falsehood.
  2. (obsolete) A word.
  3. (obsolete, Britain, dialect) A quarrel.

VerbEdit

whid (third-person singular simple present whids, present participle whidding, simple past and past participle whidded)

  1. (obsolete, Scotland, intransitive) To tell a lie.