See also: ràpid

English edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French rapide, from Latin rapidus.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

rapid (comparative more rapid or rapider, superlative most rapid or rapidest)

  1. Very swift or quick.
    a rapid stream
    rapid growth
    rapid improvement
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book VI”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC:
      Ascend my Chariot; guide the rapid Wheeles.
    • 1921, Ben Travers, chapter 5, in A Cuckoo in the Nest, Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, Page & Company, published 1925, →OCLC:
      The most rapid and most seductive transition in all human nature is that which attends the palliation of a ravenous appetite. There is something humiliating about it. [] Can those harmless but refined fellow-diners be the selfish cads whose gluttony and personal appearance so raised your contemptuous wrath on your arrival?
    • 2013 June 21, Chico Harlan, “Japan pockets the subsidy …”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 2, page 30:
      Across Japan, technology companies and private investors are racing to install devices that until recently they had little interest in: solar panels. Massive solar parks are popping up as part of a rapid build-up that one developer likened to an "explosion."
  2. Steep, changing altitude quickly. (of a slope)
  3. Needing only a brief exposure time. (of a lens, plate, film, etc.)
  4. (England, dialectal) Violent, severe.
  5. (obsolete, dialectal) Happy.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Adverb edit

rapid (comparative more rapid, superlative most rapid)

  1. (archaic, colloquial) Rapidly.

Noun edit

rapid (plural rapids)

  1. (often in the plural) A rough section of a river or stream which is difficult to navigate due to the swift and turbulent motion of the water.
  2. (dated) A burst of rapid fire.
  3. (chess) Short for rapid chess.
    • 2010, Garry Kasparov, How Life Imitates Chess, page 41:
      In these rapid games we had just twenty-five minutes each to make all our moves, a far cry from traditional chess, where games can last up to seven hours.
    • 2015, Mark Dvoretsky, For Friends and Colleagues, volume 2 (Reflections on My Profession):
      In order to avoid misunderstanding, I must note that I object to the attempts to displace normal chess with fast play, not rapid or blitz in general. I love them both, and, if I were to choose which to play, classic or rapid, I would choose rapid.
    • 2022 September 2, Nitish Pahwa, Magnus Carlsen (quoted), “The World’s Greatest Chess Player Cannot Wait to Battle His Young, Rising Rivals”, in Slate[1]:
      I haven’t played against Wesley So—I’ve played him a bunch online in rapid games, but not in classical rounds.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Related terms edit

Anagrams edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French rapide, Latin rapidus. Doublet of repede.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

rapid m or n (feminine singular rapidă, masculine plural rapizi, feminine and neuter plural rapide)

  1. fast, quick, rapid, swift, speedy, prompt, expeditious
    Synonyms: repede, iute, grăbit, prompt, sprinten, înainte

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Adverb edit

rapid

  1. quickly, rapidly, swiftly, speedily, promptly, expeditiously
    Synonyms: repede, iute, prompt, degrabă