Last modified on 4 August 2014, at 07:23

abutment

EnglishEdit

several abutments

EtymologyEdit

First attested in 1644; engineering sense first attested in 1793. From Old French aboutement.[1] Equivalent to abut +‎ -ment.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abutment (plural abutments)

  1. The point of junction between two things, in particular a support, that abuts. [First attested in the mid 17th century.][1]
  2. (engineering, architecture) The solid portion of a structure that supports the lateral pressure of an arch or vault. [First attested in the mid 18th century.][1]
  3. (engineering) A construction that supports the ends of a bridge; a structure that anchors the cables on a suspension bridge. [First attested in the mid 18th century.][1]
  4. Something that abuts, or on which something abuts. [First attested in the mid 18th century.][1]
  5. The state of abutting.
  6. (architecture) That element that shares a common boundary or surface with its neighbor.
  7. (dentistry) The tooth that supports a denture or bridge.
  8. A fixed point or surface where resistance is obtained.
    The fulcrum acted as an abutment.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 11