Last modified on 25 April 2015, at 18:15

ac

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

NounEdit

ac (plural acs)

  1. account; money of account
  2. acre
  3. air conditioning
  4. alicyclic
  5. (electricity) alternating current

AdjectiveEdit

ac (not comparable)

  1. (medicine) ante cibum, before meals

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin acus. Compare Daco-Romanian ac.

NounEdit

ac n (plural atsi/atse)

  1. needle

Classical NahuatlEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

āc (plural āc ihqueh or āquihqueh)

  1. who?

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • 1983, Karttunen, Frances, An Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl, Austin: University of Texas Press, page p. 1:
  • 2001, Lockhart, James, Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts, Stanford: Stanford University Press, page p. 210:

LadinEdit

NounEdit

ac

  1. plural form of at

LatinEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ac

  1. Alternative form of atque
  2. and, and also, and even, and too
    • Eminentissimum ac reverendissimum dominum.
      The Most Eminent and Reverend Lord.
  3. and besides
  4. than
    • Ea res longe aliter, ac ratus erat, evenit.
      It happened far differently than he had thought.

Usage notesEdit

  • ac is usually found in front of words beginning with consonants, rarely before vowels.

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English ac.

ConjunctionEdit

ac

  1. but

Middle WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ac

  1. and

PrepositionEdit

ac

  1. with

Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *aiks, from Proto-Indo-European *eiǵ-. Cognate with Old Frisian ēk, Old Saxon ēk, Dutch eik, Old High German eih (German Eiche), Old Norse eik (Swedish ek, Danish eg).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

āc f

  1. oak (wood or tree)
  2. (poetic) an oaken ship
  3. The runic character (/a/)
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *ak. Cognate with Old Saxon ac, Gothic 𐌰𐌺 (ak), Old High German oh.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ac

  1. but

Old SaxonEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ac

  1. Alternative form of ak

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin acus.

NounEdit

ac n (plural ace)

  1. needle

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ac

  1. prevocalic form of a (and)