Last modified on 11 November 2014, at 18:08

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English at, from Old English æt (at, near, by, toward), from Proto-Germanic *at (at, near, to), from Proto-Indo-European *ád (near, at). Cognate with Scots at (at), North Frisian äät, äit, et, it (at), Danish at (to), Faroese at (at, to, toward), Norwegian åt (to), Swedish åt (for, toward), Icelandic (to, towards), Gothic 𐌰𐍄 (at, at), Latin ad (to , near).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

at

  1. In or very near a particular place.
    • 1992, Rudolf M. Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, page 4
      (b) sporophyte with foot reduced, the entire sporophyte enveloped by the calyptra, which is ± stipitate at the base.
    At that precise position, at Jim’s house.
  2. (indicating time) Simultaneous, during.
    • 2012 April 19, Josh Halliday, “Free speech haven or lawless cesspool – can the internet be civilised?”, the Guardian:
      Other global taboos, such as sex and suicide, manifest themselves widely online, with websites offering suicide guides and Hot XXX Action seconds away at the click of a button. The UK government will come under pressure to block access to pornographic websites this year when a committee of MPs publishes its report on protecting children online.
    At six o’clock, at closing time, at night.
  3. In the direction of (often in an unfocused or uncaring manner).
    He threw the ball at me, he shouted at her.
  4. Occupied in (activity).
    Men at work.
  5. Indicates a position on a scale or in a series.
    Sell at 90.
    Tiger finished the round at tenth, seven strokes behind the leaders.
    I'm offering it - just to select customers - at cost.
  6. Because of.
    Laugh at a joke.
  7. Holding a given speed or rate.
    It is growing at the rate of 3% a year.
    Cruising along at fifty miles per hour.
  8. In a state of.
    She is at sixes and sevens with him.
    They are at loggerheads over how best to tackle the fiscal cliff.
    The city was at the mercy of the occupying forces.
  9. (Ireland, stressed pronunciation) bothering, irritating, causing discomfort to
    • 1995 Keith Wood, quoted in David Hughes, "Wood odds-on to take one against the head", in The Independent (London) 18 January 1995:
      I think `Jesus, my back is at me'. Then I get the ball. Off you go for 10 yards and you don't feel a thing. Then you stop and think: `Jesus, it's at me again'[.]
    • 2014 Marian Keyes "Antarctic Diary - Part 2" personal website (January 2014):
      He seems to be saying. “Ah, go on, you’re making the other lads feel bad.” But the 4th fella says, “No. Don’t be ‘at’ me. I’m just not in the form right now, I’ll stay where I am, thanks.”

Usage notesEdit

  • He threw the ball to me — (so I could catch it).
  • He threw the ball at me — (trying to hit me with it).
  • He talked to her — (conversationally).
  • He shouted at her — (aggressively).

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

at (plural ats)

  1. the @ symbol.

TranslationsEdit

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AzeriEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Turkic at, from Proto-Turkic *at, *ăt (horse).

NounEdit

Other scripts
Cyrillic ат
Roman at
Perso-Arabic آت

at (definite accusative atı, plural atlar)

  1. horse

DeclensionEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /at/, [æd̥], /a/, [æ]

ConjunctionEdit

at

  1. that

ParticleEdit

at

  1. to (infinitive-marker)
    Det er menneskeligt at fejle.
    To err is human.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

at

  1. singular past indicative of eten
  2. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of atten
  3. imperative of atten

FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse at.

PrepositionEdit

at

  1. (with dative) at, towards, to

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse at (that), from Proto-Germanic *þat (that). Cognate with Middle English at (that, conjunction and relative pronoun), Scots at (that, conjunction and relative pronoun). More at that.

ConjunctionEdit

at

  1. that

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse at (at, to), from Proto-Germanic *at (at, to). More at at.

ParticleEdit

at

  1. to (A particle used to mark the following verb as an infinitive.)
    At lyfta. (To lift)

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

at

  1. Romanization of 𐌰𐍄

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

at n (genitive singular ats, nominative plural öt)

  1. fight

DeclensionEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish att.

NounEdit

at m (genitive ait, nominative plural atanna)

  1. swelling

DeclensionEdit

VerbEdit

at (present analytic atann, future analytic atfaidh, verbal noun at, past participle ata)

  1. swell
  2. bloat

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
at n-at hat t-at
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

LadinEdit

NounEdit

at m (plural ac)

  1. act
  2. action
  3. work

LatinEdit

ConjunctionEdit

at

  1. but, yet
  2. whereas

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


LivonianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

at

  1. 3rd person plural present indicative form of vȱlda

Norwegian BokmålEdit

ConjunctionEdit

at

  1. that

Norwegian NynorskEdit

ConjunctionEdit

at

  1. that

Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (second-person singular): it
  • (third-person plural relative): ata

PronunciationEdit

  • (second-person singular): IPA(key): /at/
  • (third-person plural relative): IPA(key): /ad/

VerbEdit

at

  1. second-person singular present indicative of is
  2. third-person plural present indicative relative of is

Old NorseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *atǭ. Related to Old Norse etja.

NounEdit

at n (genitive ats, plural ǫt)

  1. conflict, fight, battle
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Icelandic: at

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *þat (that). Cognate with Old English þæt, Gothic 𐌸𐌰𐍄𐌰 (þata).

ConjunctionEdit

at

  1. that
  2. since, because, as
DescendantsEdit
  • Faroese: at
  • Icelandic:

Etymology 3Edit

From Proto-Germanic *at (at, to). Cognate with Old English æt, Old Frisian et, Old Saxon at, Old High German az, Gothic 𐌰𐍄 (at).

ParticleEdit

at

  1. to (infinitive particle)
DescendantsEdit
  • Faroese: at
  • Icelandic:

PrepositionEdit

at

  1. at, to
DescendantsEdit
  • Faroese: at
  • Icelandic:

PipilEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proto-Nahuan *ātla, from Proto-Uto-Aztecan *paha. Cognate to Nahuatl atl.

NounEdit

at

  1. water

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish att.

NounEdit

at m

  1. swelling, tumour
  2. protuberance, prominence

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

at (past dh'at, future ataidh, verbal noun at or atadh, past participle athte)

  1. swell, fester, puff up, become tumid

ReferencesEdit


SelaruEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

NumeralEdit

at

  1. (cardinal) four

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Ottoman Turkish آت (at).

NounEdit

at m (Cyrillic spelling ат)

  1. steed
  2. Arabian (horse)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


SimeulueEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Western Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *əpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

NumeralEdit

at

  1. (cardinal) four

TagalogEdit

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

at

  1. And.

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


Torres Strait CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English heart.

NounEdit

at

  1. heart

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Turkic at, from Proto-Turkic *at, *ăt (horse).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

at (definite accusative atı, plural atlar)

  1. (chess) knight
  2. (zoology) horse

DeclensionEdit

VerbEdit

at

  1. Second-person imperative of atmak.

AntonymsEdit


TurkmenEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Turkic at, from Proto-Turkic *at, *ăt (horse).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

at (definite accusative ady, plural atlar)

  1. horse
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Turkic āt (“name”), from Proto-Turkic *āt.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

at (definite accusative ady, plural atlar)

  1. name
DeclensionEdit

VolapükEdit

DeterminerEdit

at

  1. (demonstrative) this

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

at

  1. to, towards
  2. for
  3. at
  4. by

Usage notesEdit

This preposition causes the soft mutation.

InflectionEdit

Personal forms
Singular Plural
First person ata i aton ni
Second person atat ti atoch chi
Third person ato fe/fo m
ati hi f
atyn nhw

West FrisianEdit

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

at

  1. if

SynonymsEdit