Last modified on 1 August 2014, at 09:03

Old IrishEdit

VerbEdit

·aig

  1. third-person singular present indicative conjunct of aigid

VerbEdit

aig

  1. second-person singular imperative of aigid

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
aig unchanged n-aig
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish oc

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

aig

  1. At, by, near, close by.
    Tha am balach na laighe aig an taigh. - The boy is lying at the house.
    A bheil iad aig an taigh? - Are they at home?
  2. In somebody's possession.
    Bha dithis mhac aig an duine. - The man had two sons.
  3. On account of.
    aig meud aigheir - on account of his excessive joy

Usage notesEdit

  • Scottish Gaelic doesn't have a verb equivalent to English have: possession is expressed using the preposition aig.
    Tha càr ùr aig an teaghlach. - The family has a new car. (literally A new car is at the family.)
  • Aig combines with personal pronouns to form prepositional pronouns. See Derived forms below.
  • The word aig and its derivates are also often used to express possession attributively instead of possessive pronouns:
    mo thaigh = an taigh agam = my house (literally the house at me)

Derived termsEdit

  • ag
  • a'
  • The following prepositional pronouns:
Combining

pronoun

Prepositional

pronoun

Prepositional

pronoun (emphatic)

mi agam agamsa
tu agad agadsa
e aige aigesan
i aice aicese
sinn againn againne
sibh agaibh agaibhse
iad aca acasan

ReferencesEdit

  • The Illustrated Gaelic-English Dictionary (Birlinn Limited, 1901-1911, Compiled by Edward Dwelly)
  • A Pronouncing and Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language (John Grant, Edinburgh, 1925, Complied by Malcolm MacLennan)

VepsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *aika.

NounEdit

aig

  1. time

VõroEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *aika.

NounEdit

aig

  1. time