Last modified on 1 September 2014, at 18:16

TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

ag

  1. (metrology) Symbol for the attogram, an SI unit of mass equal to 10−18 grams.

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Clipping of agriculture.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ag

  1. (chiefly in compounds) Agriculture.
    He got his degree from the state ag college.

Etymology 2Edit

From Afrikaans ag, from Dutch ach.

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

ag

  1. (South Africa) Expressing annoyance, remorse, surprise etc.; oh, ah.
    • 1979, André Brink, A Dry White Season, Vintage 1998, p. 88:
      Ag, fuck it,’ he said. ‘Let bygones be bygones, man.’
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus 2010, p. 491:
      Finally, after placing four books on the desk, he turned to a sheepish Kathy and said, ‘Ag, there's nothing wrong with these desks,’ and walked out.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch acht.

NounEdit

ag (plural agte)

  1. esteem

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch achten.

VerbEdit

ag (present ag, present participle agtende, past participle geag)

  1. to regard; to deem
    Ek ag hom as 'n belangrike bate in ons maatskappy.
    I deem him as an important asset in our company.
    Hy word hoog geag.
    He is highly regarded.
  2. to heed

Etymology 3Edit

From Dutch ach.

InterjectionEdit

ag

  1. oh, oh no, shoot, damn, oh dear

Etymology 4Edit

Afrikaans cardinal numbers
7 8 9
    Cardinal : ag
    Ordinal : agste

NumeralEdit

ag

  1. (cardinal) Alternative form of agt.

AlbanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *auga, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewg- (compare Ancient Greek αὐγή (augḗ, daylight, splendor), Serbo-Croatian jug ‘south’).

NounEdit

ag m (indefinite plural agje)

  1. dawn, daybreak, pre-dawn light
  2. half-darkness, mistiness
  3. black mark around the eyes of the dead

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (particle):
    • IPA(key): [ə] before a consonant
    • IPA(key): [əɡ], [əɟ] before a vowel
  • (preposition): IPA(key): [ɛɟ]

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish oc. Akin to agus. Compare Scottish Gaelic aig.

ParticleEdit

ag

  1. particle used with the verbal noun to make a progressive aspect:
    ag siúl ― walking
    ag gáire ― laughing

PrepositionEdit

ag

  1. at
  2. used with forms of (to be) to indicate possession in place of a verb meaning ‘have
    Tá teach ag Seán.
    Seán has a house.
  3. used with forms of (to be) and a past participle to indicate a perfect tense
    Tá an teach péinteáilte ag Seán.
    Seán has painted the house.

InflectionEdit

Person Normal Emphatic
1st person sing. agam agamsa
2d person sing. agat agatsa
3d sing. masc. aige aigesean
3d sing. fem. aici aicise
1st person pl. againn againne
2d person pl. agaibh agaibhse
3d person pl. acu acusan

ReferencesEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *agos (cow), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eǵHos. Compare Old Armenian եզն (ezn), Sanskrit अही (ahī́).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ag n

  1. bullock, cow, ox
  2. deer, stag

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: agh
  • Scottish Gaelic: agh

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ag unchanged n-ag
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

Contraction of aig

ParticleEdit

ag

  1. Used before the verbal noun to form the present participle.
    Bha Seumas ag obair. - James was working.

Usage notesEdit

  • This is the form used before a vowel. Before consonants it contracts to a'. The sole exception is ag ràdh - saying.

SwedishEdit

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia sv

Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia sv

NounEdit

ag c

  1. the genus Cladium (a kind of grass)
  2. the species Cladium mariscus; great fen-sedge, saw-sedge.
  3. various sedges and rushes outside genus Cladium, e.g. genus Schoenus; bogrush in genus Juncus (tåg)

DeclensionEdit


WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PrepositionEdit

ag

  1. with (used before vowels)

Usage notesEdit

Unlike â, ag does not cause an aspirate mutation in the following word.


VolapükEdit

InterjectionEdit

ag!

  1. oh! cry of pain or surprise
  2. ah! cry of surprise