amidships

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

amidships (comparative more amidships, superlative most amidships)

  1. (nautical) In the middle of a ship, either longitudinally or laterally.
    [The U-boat captain] waited until the crosshairs lay directly amidships. “Torpedo ... los!”
    Two more torpedoes were fired; one ran erratic; the second hit amidships.
    The saloon, instead of being at the stern, according to the old method of construction, is placed more amidships.
    The main cabin, most amidships, was 8 feet 3 inches broad [...]
  2. (nautical) Usually in the line of the keel, but sometimes halfway between bow and stern; often contracted to “midships.” (FM 55-501).
  3. (figuratively) On the flank, at a vulnerable place.
    • 1960, P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Offing, chapter XX:
      In stating that the Woosters never give up, I was in error. These words caught me amidships and took all the fighting spirit out of me, leaving me a spent force.

TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

amidships

  1. A helm order, normally shortened to midships!, to centre the helm in the line of the keel.
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 15:37