Last modified on 22 August 2014, at 18:33

calculus

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Latin calculus (a pebble or stone used for counting), diminutive of calx (limestone) + -ulus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

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Wikipedia

calculus (countable and uncountable, plural calculi or calculuses)

  1. (dated, countable) calculation, computation
  2. (countable, mathematics) Any formal system in which symbolic expressions are manipulated according to fixed rules.
    lambda calculus
    predicate calculus
  3. (uncountable, often definite, the calculus) Differential calculus and integral calculus considered as a single subject; analysis.
  4. (countable, medicine) A stony concretion that forms in a bodily organ.
    renal calculus ( = kidney stone)
  5. (uncountable, dentistry) Deposits of calcium phosphate salts on teeth.
  6. (countable) A decision-making method, especially one appropriate for a specialised realm.
    • 2008 Dec 16, “Cameron calls for bankers’ ‘day of reckoning’”, Financial Times:
      The Tory leader refused to state how many financiers he thought should end up in jail, saying: “There is not some simple calculus."

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TranslationsEdit

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See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Diminutive from calx (limestone, game counter) +‎ -ulus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

calculus m (genitive calculī); second declension

  1. Diminutive of calx
  2. pebble, stone
  3. reckoning, calculating

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative calculus calculī
genitive calculī calculōrum
dative calculō calculīs
accusative calculum calculōs
ablative calculō calculīs
vocative calcule calculī

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