Last modified on 12 August 2014, at 00:31

cancer

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cancer (crab), from Ancient Greek καρκίνος (karkínos, crab); applied to cancerous tumors because the enlarged veins resembled the legs of a crab.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cancer (plural cancers)

  1. (medicine, oncology, pathology) A disease in which the cells of a tissue undergo uncontrolled (and often rapid) proliferation.
    • 2006, Edwin Black, chapter 1, Internal Combustion[1]:
      If successful, Edison and Ford—in 1914—would move society away from the [] hazards of gasoline cars: air and water pollution, noise and noxiousness, constant coughing and the undeniable rise in cancers caused by smoke exhaust particulates.
    • 2013 June 22, “Snakes and ladders”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 76: 
      Risk is everywhere. From tabloid headlines insisting that coffee causes cancer (yesterday, of course, it cured it) to stern government warnings about alcohol and driving, the world is teeming with goblins. For each one there is a frighteningly precise measurement of just how likely it is to jump from the shadows and get you.
  2. (figuratively) Something which spreads within something else, damaging the latter.
    1999, Bruce Clifford Ross-Larson, Effective Writing[2], page 134:
    Sierra Leone's post-dictator problems are almost absurd in their breadth. It once exported rice; now it can't feed itself. The life span of the average citizen is 39, the shortest in Africa. Unemployment stands at 87 percent and tuberculosis is spreading out of control. Corruption, brazen and ubiquitous, is a cancer on the economy.

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cancer.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cancer m (plural cancers)

  1. cancer

External linksEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *geng- (lump).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cancer m (genitive cancrī); second declension

  1. a crab
  2. a tumor, cancer
  3. lattice, grid, or barrier

InflectionEdit

Second declension, nominative singular in -er.

Number Singular Plural
nominative cancer cancrī
genitive cancrī cancrōrum
dative cancrō cancrīs
accusative cancrum cancrōs
ablative cancrō cancrīs
vocative cancer
cancre
cancrī

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin, French cancer.

NounEdit

cancer n

  1. cancer

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cancer c

  1. (medicine, oncology, pathology) cancer

DeclensionEdit

Usage notesEdit

  • Until circa 1970, the word kräfta was also used.

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