Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 22:13

checkmate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English chekmat, from Old French eschec mat, from Arabic, from Persian شاه مات (šāh māt, literally the king is stumped, or ambushed).

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

checkmate

  1. (chess) Word called out by the victor when making the conclusive move.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

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Wikipedia

checkmate (plural checkmates)

  1. The conclusive victory in a game of chess that occurs when an opponent's king is threatened with unavoidable capture.
  2. (figuratively, by extension) Any losing situation with no escape; utter defeat.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

checkmate (third-person singular simple present checkmates, present participle checkmating, simple past and past participle checkmated)

  1. (transitive, chess) To put the king of an opponent into checkmate.
    That jerk checkmated me in four moves!
  2. (transitive, by extension) To place in a losing situation that has no escape.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

ReferencesEdit