Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 16:25

dapper

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English daper, from Middle Dutch dapper "stalwart, nimble", from Proto-Germanic *dapraz ‘heavy; bold’ (compare German tapfer "bold", Norwegian daper "saddened, dreary"), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeb- ‘thick, heavy’ (compare Tocharian A tpär ‘high’, Latvian dàbls ‘strong’, Serbo-Croatian дебео (dèbeo) ‘fat’).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dapper (comparative more dapper, superlative most dapper)

  1. Neat, trim.
    • 1892, Henry Seton Merriman, The Slave Of The Lamp:
      This entrance is through a little courtyard, in which is the stable and coach-house combined, where Madame Perinere, a lady who paints the magic word "Modes" beneath her name on the door-post of number seventeen, keeps the dapper little cart and pony which carry her bonnets to the farthest corner of Paris.
  2. Stylishly dressed, neatly dressed, spiffy.
    • 1917, P. G. Wodehouse, The Man With Two Left Feet:
      Going down the street, you would meet a typical commercial traveller, dapper and alert.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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AfrikaansEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dapper (attributive dappere, comparative dapperder, superlative dapperste)

  1. brave, courageous

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *dappar, from Proto-Germanic *dapraz.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dapper (comparative dapperder, superlative dapperst)

  1. brave, courageous

DeclensionEdit