despair

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman despeir, from Old French desperer.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

despair (third-person singular simple present despairs, present participle despairing, simple past and past participle despaired)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To give up as beyond hope or expectation; to despair of.
    • Milton
      I would not despair the greatest design that could be attempted.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To cause to despair.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir W. Williams to this entry?)
  3. (intransitive, often with “of”) To be hopeless; to have no hope; to give up all hope or expectation.
    • Bible, 2 Corinthians i. 8
      We despaired even of life.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

despair (countable and uncountable, plural despairs)

  1. Loss of hope; utter hopelessness; complete despondency.
    He turned around in despair, aware that he was not going to survive
  2. That which is despaired of.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 14 April 2014, at 19:32