Last modified on 4 November 2014, at 10:22

diurnal

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin diurnālis, from diēs (day). Cognate with journal.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

diurnal (not comparable)

  1. Happening or occurring during daylight, or primarily active during that time.
    Most birds are diurnal.
    • Shakespeare
      Ere twice the horses of the sun shall bring / Their fiery torcher his diurnal ring.
  2. (botany) Said of a flower open, or releasing its perfume during daylight hours, but not at night.
  3. Having a daily cycle that is completed every 24 hours, usually referring to tasks, processes, tides, or sunrise to sunset.
  4. (uncommon) Done once every day; daily, quotidian.
  5. (archaic) Published daily.

QuotationsEdit

SynonymsEdit

  • (having a daily cycle): circadian (biology)

AntonymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

diurnal (plural diurnals)

  1. A flower that opens only in the day.
  2. (Catholicism) A book containing canonical offices performed during the day, hence not matins.
  3. (archaic) A diary or journal.
    • 1663, Hudibras, by Samuel Butler, part 1, canto 2
      He was by birth, some authors write, / A Russian, some a Muscovite, / And 'mong the Cossacks had been bred, / Of whom we in diurnals read.
  4. (archaic) A daily news publication.

TranslationsEdit