quotidian

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman cotidian, cotidien, Middle French cotidian, cotidien, and their source, Latin cottīdiānus, quōtīdiānus (happening every day), from adverb cottīdiē, quōtīdiē (every day, daily), from an unattested adjective derived from quot (how many) + locative form of diēs (day).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

quotidian (comparative more quotidian, superlative most quotidian)

  1. (medicine) Recurring every twenty-four hours or (more generally) daily (of symptoms etc.). [from 14th c.]
    • 1898, Patrick Manson, Tropical Diseases, p. 104:
      Quotidian periodicity we find in greater or less degree in nearly all fevers, particularly in fevers associated with suppuration.
    • 1941, American Journal of Tropical Medicine, vol. XXI:
      I regret that the effect of these statements is a denial of the observation of initial quotidian paroxysms following artificial inoculation.
  2. Happening every day; daily. [from 15th c.]
    • 2000, Marcel Berline, The Guardian, 10 Jul 2000:
      I know that the government's daily idea to solve the country's law and order problem is not meant to be taken too seriously, but every now and again I am moved to raise an eyebrow at the quotidian suggestion.
  3. Having the characteristics of something which can be seen, experienced etc. every day or very commonly; commonplace, ordinary; trivial, mundane. [from 15th c.]
    • 2002, Russ McDonald, in McEachern (Ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Shakespearean Tragedy, p. 28:
      Tragedy demanded verse, not the quotidian prose of comedy, and verse usually supplied some form of end rhyme.
    • 2010, Steven Heller & Eddie S Glaude, Becoming a Graphic Designer:
      Grids are used for such quotidian items as stationery, business cards, mailing labels, hang tags, instruction manuals, etc.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

quotidian (plural quotidians)

  1. (medicine, now rare, historical) A fever which recurs every day; quotidian malaria. [from 14th c.]
    • 1623, William Shakespeare, As You Like It:
      If I could meet that Fancie-monger, I would giue him some good counsel, for he seemes to haue the Quotidian of Loue vpon him.
    • 1671, Robnert Boyle, Usefulness of Experimental Natural Philosophy, Part II:
      I myself was, about two years since, strangely cured of a violent quotidian, which all the wonted method of physick had not so much abated, by applying to my wrists a mixture of two handfuls of bay-salt, two handfuls of the freshest English hops, and a quarter of a pound of blue currants [...].
  2. (Anglicanism, historical) A daily allowance formerly paid to certain members of the clergy. [from 16th c.]
  3. (usually with definite article) Commonplace or mundane things regarded as a class. [from 20th c.]
    • 2005, Lucy Mangan, The Guardian, 21 Sep 2005:
      More than opposable thumbs and the invention of the flinthead axe, it was our ability to transcend the quotidian by weaving tales of awe and wonder that set us apart from the beasts.

TranslationsEdit

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InterlinguaEdit

AdjectiveEdit

quotidian (comparative plus quotidian, superlative le plus quotidian)

  1. daily

Derived termsEdit

Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 16:07