Last modified on 27 August 2014, at 16:06

doggerel

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

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AdjectiveEdit

doggerel (not comparable)

  1. (poetry) Of a crude or irregular construction. (Originally applied to humorous verse, but now to verse lacking artistry or meaning.)
    • 1678, John Dryden, "Prologue to Limberham," lines 1-4,
      True wit has seen its best days long ago;
      It ne'er look'd up, since we were dipp'd in show:
      When sense in doggerel rhymes and clouds was lost,
      And dulness flourish'd at the actors' cost.
  2. (poetry) a comic or humorous verse, usually irregular in measure

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

doggerel (plural doggerels)

  1. A doggerel poem or verse.
    • 1895, Stephen Crane,The Red Badge of Courage, ch. 8,
      As he marched he sang a bit of doggerel in a high and quavering voice:
      "Sing a song 'a vic'try,
      A pocketful 'a bullets,
      Five an' twenty dead men
      Baked in a—pie."

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • doggerel” in An American Dictionary of the English Language, by Noah Webster, 1828.
  • doggerel in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • doggerel” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  • doggerel” in Microsoft's Encarta World English Dictionary, North American Edition (2007)
  • "doggerel" in Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary (Cambridge University Press, 2007)
  • doggerel” in the Compact Oxford English Dictionary (Oxford University Press, 2007)
  • Oxford English Dictionary, second edition (1989)
  • Random House Webster's Unabridged Electronic Dictionary (1987-1996)